labourism


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Related to labourism: liberalism, socialism

labourism

(ˈleɪbəˌrɪzəm) or

laborism

n
1. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the dominance of the working classes
2. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a political, social, or economic system that favours such dominance
3. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) support for workers' rights
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References in periodicals archive ?
1999) 'The imperial working class makes itself "white": white labourism in Britain, Australia, and South Africa before the First World War', Journal of Historical Sociology 12 (4): 398-421.
In contrast, for the New Left, inspired by Gramsci and the growth of Cultural Studies, identity politics constituted an exciting new field of political and personal action, uncontaminated by the ideological baggage of either Labourism or economistic Marxism.
1) For example, see: Jonathan Hyslop, 'The Imperial Working Class Makes Itself "White": White Labourism in Britain, Australia and South Africa Before the First World War', in Journal of Historical Sociology, 12, 4, 1999, pp398-421; Neville Kirk, Comrades and Cousins: Globalisation, Workers and Labour Movements in Britain, the USA and Australia from the 1880s to 1914, London: Merlin Press, 1999; Jan & Leo Lucassen, 'From Mobility Transition to Comparative Global Migration History', in Journal of Global History, 6, 2011, pp299-307.
Caroline Knowles, Race, Discourse and Labourism, Routledge,
In this revised and expanded second edition, which includes new research, author and playwright Rowbotham presents a window into a time before Labourism and Communism had become institutions and when ideas arising from resistance movements and the forms and course of socialism ohung between possibilitieso.
Labourism, regulatory capitalism and neoliberalism have all failed to solve this problem for more than 30 years, despite, in Australia's case, two decades of constant (almost unprecedented) economic growth since the early 1990s and a huge minerals investment and export boom in recent years.
Like its southern counterpart, according to O'Connor, the northern labour movement aped British labourism in what he describes as an effort to artificially contain sectarian divisions through 'an oligarchy of officialdom' (p.
Raphael Samuel (London: Routledge, 1989), 1: 275-87; Jonathan Hyslop, "The Imperial Working Class Makes Itself 'White': White Labourism in Britain, Australia, and South Africa Before the First World War," Journal of Historical Sociology 12, 4 (1999): 398-421; idem, "Scottish Labour, Race, and Southern African Empire, c.
Kelley, 1969; Theodore Rothstein, From Chartism to Labourism, London: Lawrence and Wishart, 1983; G.
The temptation was to focus on the historical shift from the one to the other, on the process by which modern pragmatic statism outgrew and eventually ousted communalism in the realm of practical possibility, by which the combination of Fabianism and Labourism came to represent British socialism in the twentieth century.
They explain the difference by pointing to a general drift away from institutional history and suggest that the labourism of the majority of trade unionists proved too uninteresting and too conservative for the nation's labour historians.