laburnum

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Related to laburnums: common laburnum

la·bur·num

 (lə-bûr′nəm)
n.
Any of several poisonous trees or shrubs of the genus Laburnum of the pea family, especially L. anagyroides, which is cultivated for its drooping clusters of yellow flowers.

[New Latin Laburnum, genus name, from Latin laburnum, broad-leaved bean-trefoil, perhaps of Etruscan origin.]

laburnum

(ləˈbɜːnəm)
n
(Plants) any leguminous tree or shrub of the Eurasian genus Laburnum, having clusters of yellow drooping flowers: all parts of the plant are poisonous
[C16: New Latin, from Latin]

la•bur•num

(ləˈbɜr nəm)

n.
any poisonous tree or shrub of the genus Laburnum, of the legume family, with drooping clusters of bright yellow flowers.
[1570–80; < New Latin, Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.laburnum - flowering shrubs or trees having bright yellow flowersLaburnum - flowering shrubs or trees having bright yellow flowers; all parts of the plant are poisonous
rosid dicot genus - a genus of dicotyledonous plants
Papilionoideae, subfamily Papilionoideae - alternative name used in some classification systems for the family Papilionaceae
Alpine golden chain, Laburnum alpinum, Scotch laburnum - an ornamental shrub or tree of the genus Laburnum
common laburnum, golden chain, golden rain, Laburnum anagyroides - an ornamental shrub or tree of the genus Laburnum; often cultivated for Easter decorations
Translations

laburnum

[ləˈbɜːnəm] Nlluvia f de oro, codeso m

laburnum

[ləˈbɜːrnəm] n (= tree) → cytise m

laburnum

nGoldregen m

laburnum

[ləˈbɜːnəm] nmaggiociondolo
References in classic literature ?
It was when the great lilacs and laburnums in the old-fashioned gardens showed their golden and purple wealth above the lichen-tinted walls, and when there were calves still young enough to want bucketfuls of fragrant milk.
It was a long, not very broad strip of cultured ground, with an alley bordered by enormous old fruit trees down the middle; there was a sort of lawn, a parterre of rose-trees, some flower-borders, and, on the far side, a thickly planted copse of lilacs, laburnums, and acacias.
The songs of the birds were heard in an aviary hard by, and the branches of laburnums and rose acacias formed an exquisite framework to the blue velvet curtains.
There was a smell of acacias in the air everywhere, and the laburnums were dripping gold over the walls of the gardens.
And they walked together round the grassplot and under the drooping green of the laburnums, in the same dim, dreamy state as they had been in a quarter of an hour before; only that Stephen had had the look he longed for, without yet perceiving in himself the symptoms of returning reasonableness, and Maggie had darting thoughts across the dimness,--how came he to be there?