lac insect

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Related to lac insects: Sticklac

lac insect

n.
Any of various scale insects that secrete lac, especially Kerria lacca (syn. Laccifer lacca) of southern Asia.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lac insect

(læk)
n
1. (Animals) any of various homopterous insects of the family Lacciferidae, esp Laccifer lacca of India, the females of which secrete lac
2. (Zoology) any of various homopterous insects of the family Lacciferidae, esp Laccifer lacca of India, the females of which secrete lac
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Kolkata's fabulous BSI Industrial Section is one gem, with its instructive and entertaining exhibits of a kind largely lost from comparable museums such as that at Kew Gardens in London; the Kolkata exhibits include fascinating models that illustrate fibre and dye production from start to finish--for example how a famous crimson dye and its by-product shellac, the world's first plastic, are derived from colonies of lac insects. The BSI is fortunate in having its collections championed by Kasturi Gupta Menon who works so tirelessly for the revival and preservation of handloom textiles.
Caption: 3 Displays at the Botanical Survey of India Industrial Section in Kolkata showing products derived from lac insects: dye, lacquerwork, shellac and the first gramophone records.
In India, research on antagonists of lac insects has focused on predaceous Lepidoptera and parasitoids that are pests of Kerria lacca (Kerr) (Narayanan 1962; Varshney 1976; Subbarayudu & Maheswahar 1998), a species cultivated to produce shellac.
Incidence of certain major parasites of lac insect, Kerria lacca (Kerr) on Schleichera oleosa.
(8) The Chinese favored a red derived from cinnabar, but India, like Europe, rendered its traditional profusion of red dyestuff from the lac insect, a creature similar to kermes, which was found on various types of trees in many parts of South Asia.
(62) Although he had to use distorted seventeenth-century engravings as his benchmark, Anderson began to wonder if what he had found in India was not cochineal but some sort of lac insect. In an effort to resolve his doubts, he even corresponded with a Company official stationed at Patna, named Keir, who had some knowledge of India's lac industry.