laccolith

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lac·co·lith

 (lăk′ə-lĭth′)
n.
A mass of igneous rock intruded between layers of sedimentary rock, resulting in uplift.

[Greek lakkos, pond, cistern + -lith.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

laccolith

(ˈlækəlɪθ) or

laccolite

n
(Geological Science) a dome-shaped body of igneous rock between two layers of older sedimentary rock: formed by the intrusion of magma, forcing the overlying strata into the shape of a dome. See lopolith
[C19: from Greek lakkos cistern + -lith]
ˌlaccoˈlithic, laccolitic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lac•co•lith

(ˈlæk ə lɪθ)
n.
a mass of igneous rock formed from magma that spread laterally into a lenticular body, forcing overlying strata to bulge upward.
[1875–80; < Greek lákko(s) pond + -lith]
lac`co•lith′ic, lac`co•lit′ic (-ˈlɪt ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

laccolith

A lens-shaped mass of intrusive igneous rock that pushes overlying rocks into a dome.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
Intrusions are subsurface concentrations of magma that have locally uplifted the mare but do not erupt, a mechanism reported for terrestrial laccoliths and described in detail in Johnson & Pollard.
Hence, sheet-like magmatic intrusion of laccoliths appears as a possible and plausible mode of formation for the dome Ha2.
The recent numerical modelling and scaling analysis by Michaut (10,11) of the magmatic intrusion processes leading to the formation of laccoliths strengthens the hypothesis of an intrusive origin of large and low lunar domes similar to those described in this study and our preceding works.
(11) Michaut C., 'Dynamics of magmatic intrusions in the upper crust; Theory applications to laccoliths on Earth and the Moon', J.
At Fort Lewis, the habitat is montane shrubland (11) superimposed on intrusive igneous rocks forming laccoliths (12).
This proposed sequence is reminiscent of the preceding phases of magmatism on Elba, the first phase of which formed the Capo Bianco and Portoferraio laccoliths at 8 Ma.
Two-stage growth of laccoliths at Elba Island (Italy).
The magmatic sequence led to the formation of a nested Christmas-tree laccolith complex with a total thickness of about 2400 m of porphyritic rocks emplaced at depths of 2--3.5 km (Rocchi et al.
Contacts with surrounding country rock, including the laccolith units of the dome, are mostly intrusive in nature and dip away from the pluton.
The general ecosystem of the area is montane shrubland (2) superimposed on intrusive igneous rocks forming laccoliths (3).
and Radon, M.: 2000, Tertiary phonolite laccolith of Marianska hora Hill, N.