lacemaking

Related to lacemaking: bobbin lace

lacemaking

(ˈleɪsmeɪkɪŋ)
n
(Textiles) the act or process of making a delicate decorative fabric with cotton, silk, etc, woven in an open web of different symmetrical patterns and figures
Translations

lacemaking

[ˈleɪsˌmeɪkɪŋ] Nlabor f de encaje

lacemaking

[ˈleɪsmeɪkɪŋ] ndentellerie f, fabrication f de dentelle

lacemaking

[ˈleɪsˌmeɪkɪŋ] nfabbricazione f dei pizzi or dei merletti
References in periodicals archive ?
Other material uncovered by excavations carried out by volunteers, including pupils from Stirling's Allan's Primary School, included medieval and post-medieval pottery, clay pipe fragments, modern glass, ceramics, 148 animal bones and a bone handle - thought to be French or Belgian in origin and possibly used as a tool in embroidery or lacemaking.
Pancras Workhouse to be instructed in the trade of stocking weaving and the girls in lacemaking at Lowdam Mill, situated ten miles from Nottingham.
Description: Threads of Creation: A Lacemaking Retreat.
On Sunday, there was an ode to the white-clad lacemaking ladies and the forro music of the Northeast that sparked waves of pride among Brazilians.
The 18th century is considered the golden age of lacemaking, by which time new fabrics such as the cottons and embroidered muslins, had a major impact and influenced the development of lighter, airier lace that was popular across the world.
Songs also existed for "spinning, knitting, lacemaking, grinding grain, churning butter and milking, all of which were women's jobs" (108).
This essay offers two case studies of current practitioners living in Western New York, with the hope of shedding light on the negotiation of meaning and aesthetics as it relates to Ireland's recent efforts to promote its lacemaking traditions around the world.
Entries run the gamut from details of The Lacemakers: Sketches" of Irish Character, with some Account of the Effort to Establish Lacemaking in Ireland (1865) to selections from The Freeman's Journal concerning the Ladies Land League (1881).
Enjoy the delights of the Welsh Highland Railway, and join the experienced lace-makers, and have a go at lacemaking yourself.
When I got home, smitten with your lace imagery, I looked up lacemaking and learned that Flemish peasants originally added it to collars and cuffs to hide the frayed edges of worn-out clothing; eventually royalty began using it to embellish their garments as well.
Lacemaking, birds, bagpipes, and Japanese floral arrangements show up in the minutes from time to time.