lacerate

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lac·er·ate

 (lăs′ə-rāt′)
tr.v. lac·er·at·ed, lac·er·at·ing, lac·er·ates
1. To rip, cut, or tear.
2. To cause deep emotional pain to; distress.
adj. (-rĭt, -rāt′)
1. Torn; mangled.
2. Wounded.
3. Having jagged, deeply cut edges: lacerate leaves.

[Middle English laceraten, from Latin lacerāre, lacerāt-, from lacer, torn.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lacerate

vb (tr)
1. to tear (the flesh, etc) jaggedly
2. to hurt or harrow (the feelings, etc)
adj
having edges that are jagged or torn; lacerated: lacerate leaves.
[C16: from Latin lacerāre to tear, from lacer mangled]
ˈlacerable adj
ˌlaceraˈbility n
ˌlacerˈation n
ˈlacerative adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lac•er•ate

(v. ˈlæs əˌreɪt; adj. -əˌreɪt, -ər ɪt)

v. -at•ed, -at•ing,
adj. v.t.
1. to tear roughly; mangle.
2. to distress or torture mentally or emotionally; wound deeply; pain greatly.
adj.
[1535–45; < Latin lacerātus, past participle of lacerāre to tear up, derivative of lacer mangled]
lac′er•a•ble, adj.
lac`er•a•bil′i•ty, n.
lac′er•a`tive, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

lacerate


Past participle: lacerated
Gerund: lacerating

Imperative
lacerate
lacerate
Present
I lacerate
you lacerate
he/she/it lacerates
we lacerate
you lacerate
they lacerate
Preterite
I lacerated
you lacerated
he/she/it lacerated
we lacerated
you lacerated
they lacerated
Present Continuous
I am lacerating
you are lacerating
he/she/it is lacerating
we are lacerating
you are lacerating
they are lacerating
Present Perfect
I have lacerated
you have lacerated
he/she/it has lacerated
we have lacerated
you have lacerated
they have lacerated
Past Continuous
I was lacerating
you were lacerating
he/she/it was lacerating
we were lacerating
you were lacerating
they were lacerating
Past Perfect
I had lacerated
you had lacerated
he/she/it had lacerated
we had lacerated
you had lacerated
they had lacerated
Future
I will lacerate
you will lacerate
he/she/it will lacerate
we will lacerate
you will lacerate
they will lacerate
Future Perfect
I will have lacerated
you will have lacerated
he/she/it will have lacerated
we will have lacerated
you will have lacerated
they will have lacerated
Future Continuous
I will be lacerating
you will be lacerating
he/she/it will be lacerating
we will be lacerating
you will be lacerating
they will be lacerating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been lacerating
you have been lacerating
he/she/it has been lacerating
we have been lacerating
you have been lacerating
they have been lacerating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been lacerating
you will have been lacerating
he/she/it will have been lacerating
we will have been lacerating
you will have been lacerating
they will have been lacerating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been lacerating
you had been lacerating
he/she/it had been lacerating
we had been lacerating
you had been lacerating
they had been lacerating
Conditional
I would lacerate
you would lacerate
he/she/it would lacerate
we would lacerate
you would lacerate
they would lacerate
Past Conditional
I would have lacerated
you would have lacerated
he/she/it would have lacerated
we would have lacerated
you would have lacerated
they would have lacerated
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.lacerate - cut or tear irregularly
rupture, tear, snap, bust - separate or cause to separate abruptly; "The rope snapped"; "tear the paper"
2.lacerate - deeply hurt the feelings of; distress; "his lacerating remarks"
spite, bruise, injure, offend, hurt - hurt the feelings of; "She hurt me when she did not include me among her guests"; "This remark really bruised my ego"
Adj.1.lacerate - irregularly slashed and jagged as if torn; "lacerate leaves"
rough - of the margin of a leaf shape; having the edge cut or fringed or scalloped
2.lacerate - having edges that are jagged from injurylacerate - having edges that are jagged from injury
injured - harmed; "injured soldiers"; "injured feelings"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

lacerate

verb
1. tear, cut, wound, rend, rip, slash, claw, maim, mangle, gash, jag Its claws lacerated his thighs.
2. hurt, wound, rend, torture, distress, torment, afflict, harrow He was born into a family already lacerated with tensions and divisions.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

lacerate

[ˈlæsəreɪt] VT (Med) → lacerar; [+ feelings] → herir
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lacerate

[ˈlæsəreɪt] vt (= cut) [+ skin, body, flesh] → lacérer
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

lacerate

vt
(lit) hand, skinverletzen; clothesaufreißen; (by glass etc) → zerschneiden; (by thorns) → zerkratzen, aufreißen; (by claws, whip) → zerfetzen; he lacerated his armer zog sich (dat)tiefe Wunden am Arm zu; she lacerated her wrist with a razor-bladesie schlitzte sich (dat)die Pulsadern mit einer Rasierklinge auf; her knee was badly laceratedsie hatte tiefe Wunden am Knie
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

lacerate

[ˈlæsəˌreɪt] vtlacerare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

lacerate

v. lacerar, desgarrar.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lacerate

vt lacerar, desgarrar, herir con un golpe cortante
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
And of course he knows himself that he is doing himself no sort of good with his moans; he knows better than anyone that he is only lacerating and harassing himself and others for nothing; he knows that even the audience before whom he is making his efforts, and his whole family, listen to him with loathing, do not put a ha'porth of faith in him, and inwardly understand that he might moan differently, more simply, without trills and flourishes, and that he is only amusing himself like that from ill-humour, from malignancy.
"Now, by the five corners of my beard!" shouted the Pharisee, who belonged to the sect called The Dashers (that little knot of saints whose manner of dashing and lacerating the feet against the pavement was long a thorn and a reproach to less zealous devotees-a stumbling-block to less gifted perambulators)--"by the five corners of that beard which, as a priest, I am forbidden to shave !-have we lived to see the day when a blaspheming and idolatrous upstart of Rome shall accuse us of appropriating to the appetites of the flesh the most holy and consecrated elements?
Suddenly he again felt that he was alive and suffering from a burning, lacerating pain in his head.
These said that the choir would keep up their lacerating attempts at melody until they would bring down a storm some day that would sink the ship.
It is well known that great scholars who have shown the most pitiless acerbity in their criticism of other men's scholarship have yet been of a relenting and indulgent temper in private life; and I have heard of a learned man meekly rocking the twins in the cradle with his left hand, while with his right he inflicted the most lacerating sarcasms on an opponent who had betrayed a brutal ignorance of Hebrew.
Take, for example, the classic-sounding "A Few Hours,'' with its undertow vocals, toe-tapping guitar and sharp, lacerating horns: The effect is a riveting blast of blues, brisk and attention-getting.
He is accused of stabbing Sanchez near a stairwell in the school and lacerating her neck, chest and face with a knife that was recovered at the scene, the police statement said.
Edward Albee's lacerating play is given a brilliant cinematic sheen by debuting director Mike Nichols.