lacteal

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Related to Lacteals: lymphatic system, thoracic duct

lac·te·al

 (lăk′tē-əl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or resembling milk.
2. Anatomy Of or relating to any of numerous minute intestinal lymph-carrying vessels that convey chyle from the intestine to lymphatic circulation and thereby to the thoracic duct.
n. Anatomy
A lacteal vessel.

[From Latin lacteus, from lac, lact-, milk; see melg- in Indo-European roots.]

lac′te·al·ly adv.

lacteal

(ˈlæktɪəl)
adj
1. of, relating to, or resembling milk
2. (Physiology) (of lymphatic vessels) conveying or containing chyle
n
(Anatomy) any of the lymphatic vessels conveying chyle from the small intestine to the thoracic duct
[C17: from Latin lacteus of milk, from lac milk]
ˈlacteally adv

lac•te•al

(ˈlæk ti əl)

adj.
1. pertaining to, consisting of, or resembling milk; milky.
2. conveying or containing chyle.
n.
3. any of the minute lymphatic vessels that convey chyle from the small intestine to the thoracic duct.
[1625–35; < Latin lacte(us) milky (lact-, s. of lac milk)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lacteal - any of the lymphatic vessels that convey chyle from the small intestine to the thoracic ductlacteal - any of the lymphatic vessels that convey chyle from the small intestine to the thoracic duct
lymph vessel, lymphatic vessel - a vascular duct that carries lymph which is eventually added to the venous blood circulation
Adj.1.lacteal - relating to or consisting of or producing or resembling milk; "lacteal fluids"; "lacteal organs"
Translations

lacteal

[ˈlæktɪəl] ADJlácteo
References in periodicals archive ?
Immunocytochemistry showed expression of AQP1 water channels at sites involved in dietary fat processing, including intrahepatic cholangiocytes, gallbladder, pancreatic microvascular endothelium and intestinal lacteals (Ma et al.).
Epithelial cell denatured, central lacteals disappeared, and a large number of leukocytes infiltrated in themodel group through light microscope observation.
They found that two genes in particular had caused a unique and crucial change in the gut: it had flattened certain 'portals' called lacteals.
Lymphatic pressure will be increased, causing the rupture of dilated intestinal and intrathoracic lacteals.[1]
Keep in mind that if you flattened all the villi and lacteals of your intestinal system--what's called your intestinal skin--it would cover an area ranging somewhere between the size of a studio apartment and a tennis court.