lacto-ovo-vegetarian


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lacto-ovo-vegetarian

n
another word for lacto-vegetarian
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

lacto-ovo-vegetarian

[ˌlæktəʊˌəʊvəʊˌvedʒɪˈtɛərɪən] Nlacto-ovo-vegetariano/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lacto-ovo-vegetarian

nLacto-ovo-Vegetarier(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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References in periodicals archive ?
The data were then segmented into one of five dietary groups: vegan (no animal products), lacto-ovo-vegetarian (consumes dairy), pesco-vegetarian (consumes dairy and seafood), semivegetarian (occasionally eats meat), and non-vegetarian (regularly eats meat).
Instead, you can just be a lacto-ovo-vegetarian and include dairy products and eggs in your diet, or lacto-vegetarian and include dairy products in your diet, or ovo-vegetarian and include eggs in your diet.
* A lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet includes plant foods, dairy products and eggs but excludes red meat, seafood and poultry.
These include semi-vegetarian (flexitarian), pesco-vegetarian, lacto-vegetarian, ovo-vegetarian, lacto-ovo-vegetarian, vegan, and raw food vegan diets.
The article "Plant-Based Diet for Heart Health" explains that there are multiple kinds of plant-based diets, most commonly including vegan, lacto-vegetarian, and lacto-ovo-vegetarian. It states that pescetarian "means they eat a plant-based diet plus fish." (7) In this article, they appear to be defining plant-based as any type of vegetarian diet excluding those that allow for meat or fish.
A lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet is a kind of vegetarian diet that includes animal products such as eggs and dairy products, but excludes the intake of meat and fish.
If one is a lacto-ovo-vegetarian (eats eggs and dairy products), meeting one's protein needs shouldn't be a problem.
A 2014 study involving Seventh-day Adventists (practitioners of a religion that advocates vegetarianism) found that people who followed a vegan diet had lower incidence of obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular mortality than those on a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet (Le and Sabate 2014).
Vegan diets were examined in two trials, a lacto-vegetarian diet in one, and lacto-ovo-vegetarian diets in the remaining four.
Researchers assessed dietary patients using a questionnaire that categorized study participants into five groups: non-vegetarian, semi-vegetarian, pesco-vegetarian (includes seafood), lacto-ovo-vegetarian (includes dairy and egg products) and vegan.
Most vegetarians are lacto-ovo-vegetarian (they eat both dairy products and eggs), while some are lacto-vegetarian (they eat dairy products but not eggs).