ladyship


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la·dy·ship

also La·dy·ship  (lā′dē-shĭp′)
n.
Used with Your, Her, or Their as a title and form of address for a woman or women holding the rank of lady.

Ladyship

(ˈleɪdɪʃɪp)
n
(preceded by: your or her) a title used to address or refer to any peeress except a duchess

la•dy•ship

(ˈleɪ diˌʃɪp)

n.
1. (often cap.) the form used in speaking of or to a woman having the title of Lady (usu. prec. by her or your).
2. the rank of a lady.
[1175–1225]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ladyship - a title used to address any peeress except a duchess; "Your Ladyship"; "Her Ladyship"
title - an appellation signifying nobility; "`your majesty' is the appropriate title to use in addressing a king"
Translations
كلمة للإحترام عند مُخاطبة السيِّدات
paní hraběnka
Deres NådeHendes Nåde
ávarpstitill lafîi
milostivá pani
hanımefendi hazretlerihanımefendileri

ladyship

[ˈleɪdɪʃɪp] N Her Ladyship/Your Ladyshipsu señoría f

ladyship

Ladyship [ˈleɪdiʃɪp] n
your Ladyship (addressing countess)Madame la comtesse; (addressing baroness)Madame la baronne

ladyship

[ˈleɪdɪʃɪp] n Her Ladyship the Countessla signora contessa
Your Ladyship → signora contessa

lady

(ˈleidi) noun
1. a more polite form of woman. Tell that child to stand up and let that lady sit down; The lady in the flower shop said that roses are expensive just now; Ladies' shoes are upstairs in this shop; (also adjective) a lady doctor.
2. a woman of good manners and refined behaviour. Be quiet! Ladies do not shout in public.
3. in the United Kingdom, used as the title of, or a name for, a woman of noble rank. Sir James and Lady Brown; lords and ladies.
ˈladylike adjective
like a lady in manners. She is too ladylike to swear.
ˈLadyship noun
(with Her, ~Your etc) a word used in speaking to, or about, a woman with the title `Lady'. Thank you, Your Ladyship; Ask Her Ladyship for permission.
ˈladybird noun
(American ˈladybug) a type of little round beetle, usually red with black spots.

lady's fingers

noun plural
the long sticky green pods of a tropical plant, used as a vegetable.
References in classic literature ?
"That your ladyship would have the kindness to oblige me with a little conversation," returns Mr.
"Several, your ladyship. Several before your ladyship condescended to favour me with an answer."
Yes, to be sure, that he is, and, as your ladyship says, I don't know why I should be ashamed of loving him, though he is my betters.
A day may yet come when the throng of carriages waiting at the door of the fashionable portrait-painter will include her Ladyship's vehicle, and bring me the tardy expression of her Ladyship's regret.
Her ladyship's correspondence and visiting list, her ladyship's household bills and ledgers; her ladyship's Diary and Memorandum-book (bound in scarlet morocco); her ladyship's desk, envelope-case, match-box, and taper candlestick (all in ebony and silver); her ladyship herself, presiding over her responsibilities, and wielding her materials, equal to any calls of emergency, beautifully dressed in correct morning costume, blessed with perfect health both of the secretions and the principles; absolutely void of vice, and formidably full of virtue, presented, to every properly-constituted mind, the most imposing spectacle known to humanity--the British Matron on her throne, asking the world in general, When will you produce the like of Me?
But she was certainly strengthening more rapidly than I could have ventured to anticipate, and she was able to send kind messages to Lady Glyde, saying that she was fast getting well, and entreating her ladyship not to exert herself again too soon.
"Yes, madame; but it was not expected that your ladyship would leave for Belliere for the next few days."
"I have already formed an opinion on this case, says Sergeant Cuff, "which I beg your ladyship's permission to keep to myself for the present.
and what can I do for you in her ladyship's place?"
"I confess," said he, "that I should not have been at all surprised by her ladyship's asking us on Sunday to drink tea and spend the evening at Rosings.
"I am glad to wait on your ladyship," she began, without giving Lady Janet an opportunity of speaking first.
Her ladyship's medical attendant and near relative, Doctor Softly, was immediately called in, and predicted the most fatal results.