laetrile


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Related to laetrile: Vitamin B17

la·e·trile

 (lā′ĭ-trĭl′, -trəl)
n.
A substance derived from amygdalin that has been promoted by some individuals as a treatment for cancer, although scientific studies have found no evidence of its effectiveness.

[lae(vorotatory) (variant of levorotatory) + (ni)trile.]

laetrile

(ˈleɪəˌtraɪl)
n
(Pharmacology) an extract of peach stones, containing amygdalin, sold as a cure for cancer but judged useless and possibly dangerous by medical scientists
[C20: from laevorotatory + nitrile]

la•e•trile

(ˈleɪ ɪ trɪl)

n.
a controversial drug prepared chiefly from apricot pits and purported to cure cancer.
[1950–55; lae(voratatory) + (ni)trile]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.laetrile - a substance derived from amygdalin; publicized as an antineoplastic drug although there is no supporting evidence
amygdalin - a bitter cyanogenic glucoside extracted from the seeds of apricots and plums and bitter almonds
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References in periodicals archive ?
Amygdalin (also known as Laetrile or vitamin B17) is a poisonous cyanogenic glycoside substance found naturally in many plants, including raw nuts such as bitter almonds and the pips of many fruits (particularly apricot pips or kernels).
After additional treatments with laetrile, a debatable apricot-pit-based injection, McQueen discussed he was in recuperation, however he passed away in a while thereafter, going after surgical procedure to remove cancer from his tummy and neck.
After added treatments with laetrile, a controversial apricot-pit-based injection, McQueen mentioned he remained in recuperation, yet he died in a while after that, going after surgery to erase cancer from his belly and neck.
Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted for amygdalin relevant reports using the PubMed database with the main search term "Amygdalin" or "laetrile", at times combined with "cancer", "patient", "cyanide" or "toxic".
Ralph Moss explains that when he worked in Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, laetrile, extract of a nutrient found in the seeds of plants (apricot seed), was found in their research labs to be an effective and "a promising nontoxic cancer drug." The people of Sloan-Kettering, excited about the findings of their research, proceeded twice in 1974 and 1975 to Washington, arguing their points of view on laetrile and literally begging from the government for funds to continue the research and allow them to do clinical trials, as laetrile showed positive results on lab animals.
Social movements: Laetrile / Finally, during the past few decades, the lay population has assumed a greater role in pressuring the FDA to make drugs accessible to the seriously ill more quickly and more broadly.
In the United States, a doctor who would risk treating a patient with laetrile and vegetarian diet would be ostracized by the profession.
But to Moss' surprise, numerous letters were written in regard to a substance called amygdalin, or, more popularly, laetrile. Laetrile was a cancer treatment that came from the kernel of an apricot pit, and many of the letter writers suggested this could be a potent weapon in the war against cancer.
However, some people have given that name to laetrile, an extract from the pips and stones of fruit, in particular apricot stones.
Vitamins present in papaya leaf are thiamin (B1) riboflavin (B2) niacin (B3) vitamin B6 ascorbic acid (C) and especially B17 (laetrile) which is said to be used for treatment of cancer.