laggard

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lag·gard

 (lăg′ərd)
n.
One that lags; a straggler.
adj.
Slow or delayed in action. See Synonyms at slow.

lag′gard·ly adv.
lag′gard·ness n.

laggard

(ˈlæɡəd)
n
1. a person who lags behind
2. a dawdler or straggler
adj
rare sluggish, slow, or dawdling
ˈlaggardly adv
ˈlaggardness n

lag•gard

(ˈlæg ərd)

n.
1. a person or thing that lags; lingerer; loiterer.
adj.
2. moving, developing, or responding slowly; sluggish.
[1695–1705; lag1 + -ard]
lag′gard•ly, adj., adv.
lag′gard•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.laggard - someone who takes more time than necessarylaggard - someone who takes more time than necessary; someone who lags behind
do-nothing, idler, layabout, loafer, bum - person who does no work; "a lazy bum"
lingerer, loiterer - someone who lingers aimlessly in or about a place
slowcoach, slowpoke, stick-in-the-mud, plodder - someone who moves slowly; "in England they call a slowpoke a slowcoach"
potterer, putterer - a person who putters about
straggler, strayer - someone who strays or falls behind
Adj.1.laggard - wasting time
slow - not moving quickly; taking a comparatively long time; "a slow walker"; "the slow lane of traffic"; "her steps were slow"; "he was slow in reacting to the news"; "slow but steady growth"

laggard

noun straggler, lounger, lingerer, piker (Austral. & N.Z. slang), snail, saunterer, loafer, loiterer, dawdler, skiver (Brit. slang), idler, slowcoach (Brit. informal), sluggard, bludger (Austral. & N.Z. informal), slowpoke (U.S. & Canad. informal) a reputation as a technological laggard in the personal-computer area

laggard

nounadjective
Proceeding at a rate less than usual or desired:
Informal: poky.
Translations

laggard

[ˈlægəd] N (= having fallen behind) → rezagado/a m/f; (= idler) → holgazán/ana m/f

laggard

n (= sb who has fallen behind)Nachzügler(in) m(f); (= idler)Trödler(in) m(f); he is a laggard in love (liter, hum)er ist nicht so stürmisch
adj student, workerfaul

laggard

[ˈlægəd] n (old) → lento/a → tiratardi m/f inv
References in classic literature ?
This was the third time his orders had been treated with contempt, and the ship wantonly detained, and it should be the last; so he spread all sail and put to sea, swearing he would leave the laggards to shift for themselves.
The remains of our regiment which had been in action rapidly formed up and moved to the right; from behind it, dispersing the laggards, came two battalions of the Sixth Chasseurs in fine order.
The congregation being fully assembled, now, the bell rang once more, to warn laggards and stragglers, and then a solemn hush fell upon the church which was only broken by the tittering and whispering of the choir in the gallery.
Out upon you all, as a set of laggards and hang-backs!
"By the way, sire," said Gossip Coictier, "I had forgotten that in the first agitation, the watch have seized two laggards of the band.
The lessons of yesterday had been that retribution was a laggard and blind.
"No laggard may claim Tara of Helium; but haste now lest thou lose also Olvia Marthis, whom I have never seen wait long to be claimed for this or any other dance."
Pambrune for their improvement Religion Code of laws Range of the Lower Nez Perces Camash, and other roots Nez Perce horses Preparations for departure Refusal of supplies Departure A laggard and glutton
It awaited the family laggard, who found any sort of inconvenience (to others) less disagreeable than getting up when he was called.
The horns of the victors sounded merry and cheerful flourishes, until the last laggard of the camp was at his post; but the instant the British fifes had blown their shrill signal, they became mute.
Never have I been more laggard in fighting than in eating and drinking.
Could the Judge but quaff a glass, it might enable him to shake off the unaccountable lethargy which (for the ten intervening minutes, and five to boot, are already past) has made him such a laggard at this momentous dinner.