laicity


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laicity

(leɪˈɪsɪtɪ)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the fact or state of being laical
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the fact or state of being laical, or the quality or influence of the laity
References in periodicals archive ?
Preferably, the term "laicity" is more comprehensive in explaining the Turkish experience.
Islam, to make it worse, is seen by many, notably in France, as combatting hard won laicity in western society.
I believe that a version of laicity accompanied by a solid law guaranteeing religious freedom offers a framework for going forward.
"Change within Ennahdha is an orientation towards specialisation in politics rather than towards laicity," Rached Ghannouchi asserted during the debate.
Laicity (from the French laicite, which was made into law in 1905) has become the foundation of a new political society, based on a necessary separation between the Church and the State.
367 (2007); Patrick Weil, Why the French Laicity is Liberal, 30 Cardozo L.
The essays in part two, "Principles and Values," examine the historically specific meanings of key republican tenets, beginning with the republican triad of Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity, and including such terms as democracy, laicity, citizenship, universalism, the civilizing mission, parite, and the state.
"Laicity" strengthens the historical principle of separation of church and state, which was already established in Article 130, but it goes beyond this to add basic concepts such as freedom of conscience, independence of politics from religion (which involves more than mere separation of church and state), equality of individuals and organizations before the law and nondiscrimination.
Abstract: The proper laicity of a Christian layperson implies his right-duty of being present as citizen in the public and temporary affairs and to impregnate these with his faith.
Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, freedom of religion and laicity have played a crucial role in the history of political ideas.
The document calls upon Christians to work for "an all-inclusive, shared civic order" that protects "human rights, human dignity and religious freedom." Twice, it dwells on the concept of "positive laicity"--meaning, in effect, a positive form of secularism.
Of continuing use is Rosemary Goldie's "Lay, Laity, Laicity: A Bibliographical Survey of Three Decades," in Elements for a Theology of the Laity, Special issue of "The Laity Today" (Vatican City: Pontifical Council for the Laity, 1979), 107-18.