laigh

laigh

(leɪx)
adj
(Physical Geography) (of land or property) low-lying
n
(Physical Geography) a low-lying piece of land
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References in periodicals archive ?
This is a "Paint and Sip" in which artist Fiona will guide participants step by step in creating a detail of Bannockburn House's stunning Laigh Hall ceiling.
He said: "This game at Laigh bent is an opportunity to gauge where we are before the big challenge of the league, although we aim to be highly competitive."
And she replicated her early promise in the singles chart as her debut album, I Cry When I Laigh, went to number 1 in the UK and entered the USA top 25, while also securing her four platinum discs.
COVETED TITLE: Hugh and Alistair Watson, owners of last year's winner Laigh Tarbeg of Cumnock
Many of those who attended the service at Kilmarnock's New Laigh Kirk wore bright colours in tribute to the "much loved" daughter, sister and auntie, who mourners heard "refused to be a wallflower".
Many years ago in what was then the Laigh Kirk my late wife suggested to the committee ladies of the Guild that they conduct the Sunday morning service.
The first and fifth prizes were won by John McMillan, Laigh Plewland, with Ken and Madge.
of Devonshire, the poem's addressee, can possibly expect 'frae a cauld Scottish Bard,/With Brose and Bannocks poorly fed,/In Hoden Gray right hashly cled.' (11) He continues to paint a picture of Scottish privation, as the humbly-clad poet labors to dig up peat for his fire, returning home to his 'laigh Hut' where six people are crammed in, head to foot, sleeping on heather.
Figure 4(a) showed the XRD patterns of the novel polymer PGL was laigh and diffuse, compared to its monomer d-GL.
Another cast is at Princeton University, whose president Witherspoon once was--after serving as a minister at the Laigh Kirk in Paisley he crossed the Atlantic and became a signatory of the Declaration of Independence.