lairdly

lairdly

(ˈlɛədlɪ)
adj, -lier or -liest
(Sociology) Scot belonging or relating to a laird or lairds
References in periodicals archive ?
As Michael Lynch has pointed out, Home was a younger son of an established gentry family, like Sir John Maitland of Thirlestane, whose own tenure as Scottish chancellor and secretary of state had ushered in a new lairdly ascendancy that threatened the established Scottish nobility.(76) As the Earl of Dunbar, his territorial acquisitiveness caused anxiety for both Scottish and English statesmen, despite the royal assurance that the earl merely required lands as bases from which to conduct the king's affairs.
But the unity it staged was taking place at the very moment when the industrial workers in the West of Scotland were threatening insurrection and while Scott, like Leicester, was engaged in the conspiracies of his own secret spaces, the spaces of his Edinburgh business dealings, which would, within four years, come decisively into conflict with the lairdly spaces of Abbotsford.
The lairdly class prophesied a reincarnation of Red Clydeside, the traditional hotbed of Glasgow radicalism, and the resulting desecration of their rich country estates; Tories hyperventilated about the barbaric breakup of their ancient kingdom.