laird

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laird

 (lârd)
n. Scots
The owner of a landed estate.

[Scots, from Middle English lard, variant of lord, owner, master; see lord.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

laird

(lɛəd; Scottish lerd)
n
Scot a landowner, esp of a large estate
[C15: Scottish variant of lord]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

laird

(lɛərd)

n. Scot.
a landowner.
[1400–50; late Middle English laverd, northern and Scots form of loverd lord]
laird′ly, adj.
laird′ship, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

laird

A Scottish word for lord, used to mean a landowner.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.laird - a landowner
Scotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts
landholder, landowner, property owner - a holder or proprietor of land
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

laird

[lɛəd] N (Scot) → terrateniente m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

laird

n (Scot) → Gutsherr(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Lairdships are technically inherited in Scotland, so it was thought that James would become a Laird of of Glen Affric after David's death, thus making Pippa his "Lady."
Royal expert and Royal Musings founder Marlene Koenig explains: "The lairdship of Glen Afric is a Scottish feudal barony, not a peerage"
Even if James inherited the lairdship from his father, it's highly unlikely Pippa would still get titled as a Lady, because the practice has all but disappeared.