laity


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la·i·ty

 (lā′ĭ-tē)
n.
1. Laypeople considered as a group.
2. All those persons who are not members of a given profession or other specialized field.

[Middle English laite, from lay, of the laity; see lay2.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

laity

(ˈleɪɪtɪ)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) laymen, as distinguished from clergymen
2. all people not of a specific occupation
[C16: from lay3]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

la•i•ty

(ˈleɪ ɪ ti)

n.
1. the body of religious worshipers, as distinguished from the clergy.
2. the people outside of a particular profession, as distinguished from those belonging to it.
[1535–45; lay3 + -ity]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Laity

 laymen collectively, 1616; non-professional in contrast with professionals in certain areas of work.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.laity - in Christianity, members of a religious community that do not have the priestly responsibilities of ordained clergy
hoi polloi, masses, the great unwashed, multitude, people, mass - the common people generally; "separate the warriors from the mass"; "power to the people"
layman, layperson, secular - someone who is not a clergyman or a professional person
clergy - in Christianity, clergymen collectively (as distinguished from the laity)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
laïcat

laity

[ˈleɪɪtɪ] N the laitylos seglares, los legos
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

laity

[ˈleɪɪti] nlaïques mpl
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

laity

n
(= laymen)Laienstand m, → Laien pl
(= those outside a profession)Laien pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

laity

[ˈleɪɪtɪ] collective n the laity (as opposed to the clergy) → i laici, il laicato; (as opposed to professionals) → i non appartenenti ad una categoria professionale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

laity

n. [nonprofessional] lego.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
A quotation from the Bible came to my lips, but I held my tongue, for I know that clergymen think it a little blasphemous when the laity poach upon their preserves.
"I do not drink" -- Bazin pushed away with dignity the officer's hand -- "'tis good only for the laity."
``Mine honest friend,'' said he, ``if the jangling of thy bells bad not dizzied thine understanding, thou mightst know Clericus clericum non decimat; that is to say, we churchmen do not exhaust each other's hospitality, but rather require that of the laity, giving them thus an opportunity to serve God in honouring and relieving his appointed servants.''
Collins listened to her with the determined air of following his own inclination, and, when she ceased speaking, replied thus:-- "My dear Miss Elizabeth, I have the highest opinion in the world in your excellent judgement in all matters within the scope of your understanding; but permit me to say, that there must be a wide difference between the established forms of ceremony amongst the laity, and those which regulate the clergy; for, give me leave to observe that I consider the clerical office as equal in point of dignity with the highest rank in the kingdom-- provided that a proper humility of behaviour is at the same time maintained.
Tulkinghorn, one of its trustiest representatives--may scatter, on occasion, in the eyes of the laity.
The medieval Church, at first merely from the brutal necessities of a period of anarchy, had for the most part frowned on the joy and beauty of life, permitting pleasure, indeed, to the laity, but as a thing half dangerous, and declaring that there was perfect safety only within the walls of the nominally ascetic Church itself.
'Say "taken," Tope--to the Dean,' the younger rook interposes in a low tone with this touch of correction, as who should say: 'You may offer bad grammar to the laity, or the humbler clergy, not to the Dean.'
"A brilliant idea, and most true!" cried Lebedeff, "for he never even touched the laity. Sixty monks, and not a single layman!
But Lydgate had not been experienced enough to foresee that his new course would be even more offensive to the laity; and to Mr.
Discussion of the relationship between clergy and the laity, which is defined in a delicate balance between authority and charism, taking many forms of coresponsibility and reciprocity, is refreshingly realistic.
Instinctively, the church began to feel that the long-overlooked laity were the key to the situation.
There were two issues of importance: how to persuade those with ecclesial authority to respond positively to lay empowerment, and how to educate laity about its mission.