lake


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Related to lake: Lake Vostok

Lake

or Lake of  (lāk) or Loch (lŏk, lôKH)
For the names of actual lakes, see the specific element of the name; for example, Erie, Lake; Lucerne, Lake of; Lomond, Loch. Other geographic names beginning with Lake are entered under Lake; for example, Lake Charles, Louisiana.

lake 1

 (lāk)
n.
1. A large inland body of fresh water or salt water.
2. A scenic pond, as in a park.
3. A large pool of liquid: a lake of spilled coffee on my desk.

[Middle English, from Old French lac and from Old English lacu, both from Latin lacus.]

lake 2

 (lāk)
n.
1. A pigment consisting of organic coloring matter with an inorganic, usually metallic base or carrier, used in dyes, inks, and paints.
2. A deep red.

[From French laque; see lac1.]

lake

(leɪk)
n
1. (Physical Geography) an expanse of water entirely surrounded by land and unconnected to the sea except by rivers or streams.
2. anything resembling this
3. a surplus of a liquid commodity: a wine lake.
[C13: lac, via Old French from Latin lacus basin]

lake

(leɪk)
n
1. (Dyeing) a bright pigment used in textile dyeing and printing inks, produced by the combination of an organic colouring matter with an inorganic compound, usually a metallic salt, oxide, or hydroxide. See also mordant
2. (Dyeing) a red dye obtained by combining a metallic compound with cochineal
[C17: variant of lac1]

lake1

(leɪk)

n.
1. a body of fresh or salt water of considerable size, surrounded by land.
2. any similar body or pool of other liquid, as oil.
[before 1000; Middle English lak(e),lac(e) < Old French lac < Latin lacus]

lake2

(leɪk)

n.
1. any of various pigments prepared from animal, vegetable, or coal-tar coloring matters by chemical or other union with metallic compounds.
2. a red pigment prepared from lac or cochineal by combination with a metallic compound.
[1610–20; variant of lac1]

Lake

(leɪk)

n.
Simon, 1866–1945, U.S. engineer and naval architect.

lake

(lāk)
A large inland body of standing fresh or salt water.

lake

  • demersal - Describing a fish that lives close to the floor of the sea or a lake.
  • eyot, ait - A small island in a river or lake is an eyot or ait.
  • benthos - The flora and fauna at the bottom of a sea or lake.
  • lagoon - Derived from Latin lacuna, "pool, lake" or "hole, gap."

lake

A large sheet of water surrounded by land or, more rarely, ice.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lake - a body of (usually fresh) water surrounded by landlake - a body of (usually fresh) water surrounded by land
artificial lake, man-made lake, reservoir - lake used to store water for community use
bayou - a swampy arm or slow-moving outlet of a lake (term used mainly in Mississippi and Louisiana)
body of water, water - the part of the earth's surface covered with water (such as a river or lake or ocean); "they invaded our territorial waters"; "they were sitting by the water's edge"
floor - the bottom surface of any lake or other body of water
inlet, recess - an arm off of a larger body of water (often between rocky headlands)
lagoon, laguna, lagune - a body of water cut off from a larger body by a reef of sand or coral
loch - Scottish word for a lake
lough - Irish word for a lake
oxbow lake - a crescent-shaped lake (often temporary) that is formed when a meander of a river is cut off from the main channel
pond, pool - a small lake; "the pond was too small for sailing"
shore - the land along the edge of a body of water
tarn - a mountain lake (especially one formed by glaciers)
lentic - of or relating to or living in still waters (as lakes or ponds)
2.lake - a purplish red pigment prepared from lac or cochineal
pigment - dry coloring material (especially a powder to be mixed with a liquid to produce paint, etc.)
3.lake - any of numerous bright translucent organic pigments
pigment - dry coloring material (especially a powder to be mixed with a liquid to produce paint, etc.)

lake

noun pond, pool, reservoir, loch (Scot.), lagoon, mere, lough (Irish), tarn They can go fishing in the lake.
Related words
adjective lacustrine

Lakes, lochs, and loughs

Allen, Annecy, Aral Sea or Lake Aral, Ard, Athabaska, Averno, Awe, Baikal, Bala, Balaton, Balkhash, Bangweulu, Bassenthwaite, Belfast, Biel, Bodensee, Buttermere, Caspian Sea, Chad, Champlain, Como, Coniston Water, Constance, Crummock Water, Dead Sea, Derwentwater, Dongting, Earn, Edward, Ennerdale Water, Erie, Erne, Eyre, Frome, Fyne, Garda, Gatún, Geneva, Grasmere, Great Bear, Great Bitter, Great Lakes, Great Salt, Great Slave, Hawes Water, Huron, Ijsselmeer or Ysselmeer, Iliamna, Ilmen, Issyk-Kul, Kariba, Katrine, Kivu, Koko Nor or Kuku Nor, Kootenay, Ladoga, Laggan, Lake of the Woods, Leven, Linnhe, Little Bitter, Lochy, Lomond, Lucerne, Lugano, Léman, Maggiore, Malawi, Managua, Manitoba, Maracaibo, Mead, Meech, Memphremagog, Menteith, Michigan, Miraflores, Mistassini, Mobutu, Morar, Mweru, Nam Co or Nam Tso, Nasser, Neagh, Ness, Neuchâtel, Nicaragua, Nipigon, Nipissing, No, Nyasa, Okanagan, Okeechobee, Onega, Oneida, Onondaga, Ontario, Patos, Peipus, Pontchartrain, Poopó, Poyang or P'o-yang, Pskov, Rannoch, Reindeer, Rudolf, Saint Clair, Saint John, Sea of Galilee, Sevan, Stanley Pool, Superior, Sween, Taal, Tahoe, Tana, Tanganyika, Taupo, Tay, Thirlmere, Thun, Tien, Titicaca, Tonle Sap, Torrens, Torridon, Trasimene, Tummel, Turkana, Ullswater, Urmia, Van, Victoria, Volta, Waikaremoana, Washington, Wast Water, Windermere, Winnebago, Winnipeg, Zug, Zürich
Translations
بُحَيْرَةٌبُحَيْرَه
езеро
jezero
lago
järv
دریاچه
järvilakka
झील
jezero
lakk
danau
stöîuvatnvatn
호수
lacus
ežeras
ezers
lac
jazero
jezero
sjö
ทะเลสาบ
озеро
دریاچہ
hồhồ nước

lake

1 [leɪk]
A. Nlago m
the Lakes (Brit) = the Lake District Lake Michiganel Lago Michigan
the Great Lakeslos Grandes Lagos
wine lakeexcedentes mpl de vino
oh! go and jump in a lake!¡que te zurzan!, ¡vete a freír espárragos!
B. CPD the Lake District Nel País de los Lagos (región de lagos en el noroeste de Inglaterra)
lake dweller N (Hist) habitante de una población lacustre
lake dwelling Nvivienda f lacustre

lake

2 [leɪk] N (= colour) → laca f

lake

[ˈleɪk] nlac m
Lake Geneva → le lac Léman

lake

:
Lake Constance
nder Bodensee
Lake District
nLake District m (Seengebiet im NW Englands)
lake dweller
nPfahlbaubewohner(in) m(f)
lake dwelling
nPfahlbau m
Lake Poets
pl Dichter des Lake District: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Southey
lakeside
nSeeufer nt
attram See

lake

1
nSee m

lake

2
n (colour) → Karm(es)inrot nt

lake

[leɪk] nlago

lake

(leik) noun
a large area of water surrounded by land. They go swimming in / sailing on the lake; Lake Michigan.

lake

بُحَيْرَةٌ jezero See λίμνη lago järvi lac jezero lago 호수 meer innsjø jezioro lago озеро sjö ทะเลสาบ göl hồ nước
References in classic literature ?
Laurie didn't seem to know where to begin, but Jo's eager questions soon set him going, and he told her how he had been at school in Vevay, where the boys never wore hats and had a fleet of boats on the lake, and for holiday fun went on walking trips about Switzerland with their teachers.
We put sheets of cotton wool under it for a snow-field, and Jake's pocket-mirror for a frozen lake.
About riding to the mill behind Gluglu; fishing back in the lake with their Uncle Jasper; picking pecans with Lidie's little black brood, and hauling chips in their express wagon.
While writing this book, fully a quarter of a century since, it occurred to us that the French name of this lake was too complicated, the American too commonplace, and the Indian too unpronounceable, for either to be used familiarly in a work of fiction.
It came dangerously, for one night the river, leaping the feeble barrier of Devil's Ford, swept away houses and banks, scattered with unconscious irony the laboriously collected heaps of gravel left for hydraulic machinery, and spread out a vast and silent lake across the submerged flat.
In the early epochs of our race, men dwelt in temporary huts, of bowers of branches, as easily constructed as a bird's-nest, and which they built,--if it should be called building, when such sweet homes of a summer solstice rather grew than were made with hands,--which Nature, we will say, assisted them to rear where fruit abounded, where fish and game were plentiful, or, most especially, where the sense of beauty was to be gratified by a lovelier shade than elsewhere, and a more exquisite arrangement of lake, wood, and hill.
We were on the edge of the lake, and, as we had lately begun geography, the lake was the Sea of Azof.
On the eastern shore of our Lake Erie, Don; but--I crave your courtesy--may be, you shall soon hear further of all that.
Assuming the blubber to be the skin of the whale; then, when this skin, as in the case of a very large Sperm Whale, will yield the bulk of one hundred barrels of oil; and, when it is considered that, in quantity, or rather weight, that oil, in its expressed state, is only three fourths, and not the entire substance of the coat; some idea may hence be had of the enormousness of that animated mass, a mere part of whose mere integument yields such a lake of liquid as that.
Four or five miles to the eastward lay the lake, and over this the bitter winds came raging.
A most noble benignity and purity reposed in the counte- nance of him they called Sir Galahad, and likewise in the king's also; and there was majesty and greatness in the giant frame and high bearing of Sir Launcelot of the Lake.
I and my agent panoplied ourselves in walking-costume, one bright morning, and started down the lake on the steamboat; we got ashore at the village of Wa"ggis; three-quarters of an hour distant from Lucerne.