lamina

(redirected from lamina dura)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.
Related to lamina dura: alveolar crest, bundle bone

lam·i·na

 (lăm′ə-nə)
n. pl. lam·i·nae (-nē′) or lam·i·nas
1. A thin plate, sheet, or layer.
2. Botany
a. The expanded area of a leaf or petal; a blade.
b. The bladelike part of a kelp.
3. A thin layer of bone, membrane, or other tissue.
4. Zoology A thin scalelike or platelike structure, as one of the thin layers of sensitive vascular tissue in the hoof of a horse.
5. Cytology A thin layer inside the nuclear membrane of a cell that is composed of a meshlike network of protein fibers.
6. Geology A narrow bed of rock.

[Latin lāmina.]

lam′i·nar, lam′i·nal adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lamina

(ˈlæmɪnə)
n, pl -nae (-ˌniː) or -nas
1. a thin plate or layer, esp of bone or mineral
2. (Geological Science) a thin plate or layer, esp of bone or mineral
3. (Anatomy) a thin plate or layer, esp of bone or mineral
4. (Botany) botany the flat blade of a leaf, petal, or thallus
[C17: New Latin, from Latin: thin plate]
ˈlaminar, ˈlaminary, laminose, laminous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lam•i•na

(ˈlæm ə nə)

n., pl. -nae (-ˌni)
-nas.
1. a thin plate or layer.
2. a thin layer or coating lying over another, as in certain minerals.
3. the blade or expanded portion of a leaf.
[1650–60; < Latin lāmina]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

lam·i·na

(lăm′ə-nə)
1. Botany The expanded area of a leaf or petal; a blade.
2. A thin layer of bone, membrane, or other tissue.
3. Geology A thin layer of sediment.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lamina - a thin plate or layer (especially of bone or mineral)lamina - a thin plate or layer (especially of bone or mineral)
lamina arcus vertebrae - lamina of the vertebral arch; the flattened posterior part of the vertebral arch from which the spinous process extends
plate - any flat platelike body structure or part
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

lamina

noun
A thin outer covering of an object:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
lemezlevéllemez
lamina

lam·i·na

n. L. lámina, placa o capa fina;
___ arcus vertebrae___ del arco vertebral;
___ basalis choroidae___ basal de la coroide;
___ limitans anterior corneae___ elástica anterior de la córnea;
___ limitans posterior corneae___ elástica posterior de la córnea;
___ multiform of cerebral cortex___ multiforme de la corteza cerebral.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Radiographic investigations revealed that tooth 31 was foreshortened coronally and had large periapical radiolucency with loss of lamina dura in the apical third of the root.
The apical root of tooth 45 continued to grow beyond the apexification level with a normal periodontal ligament space and lamina dura. No evidence of periapical radiolucency was noted (Figure 5).
Generally in patient with AOT lesion, the lamina dura is commonly intact and periodontal ligament is normal.
The lamina dura is lost around the root as it becomes incorporated in the bone, indicating replacement resorption.
Radiographic evaluation revealed that there was radiolucent periapical involvement, widening of periodontal ligament space and disruption of the lamina dura. Clinical finding was sinus tract that release the suppurative pressure (Figure 1).