lampoon

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Related to lampooned: parodists, parodical

lam·poon

 (lăm-po͞on′)
n.
A written attack ridiculing a person, group, or institution.
tr.v. lam·pooned, lam·poon·ing, lam·poons
To ridicule or satirize in a lampoon.

[French lampon, perhaps from lampons, let us drink (from a common refrain in drinking songs), first person pl. imperative of lamper, to gulp down, of Germanic origin.]

lam·poon′er, lam·poon′ist n.
lam·poon′er·y n.

lampoon

(læmˈpuːn)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a satire in prose or verse ridiculing a person, literary work, etc
vb
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (tr) to attack or satirize in a lampoon
[C17: from French lampon, perhaps from lampons let us drink (frequently used as a refrain in poems)]
lamˈpooner, lamˈpoonist n
lamˈpoonery n

lam•poon

(læmˈpun)
n.
1. a broad, often harsh satire directed against an individual or institution.
v.t.
2. to ridicule in a lampoon.
[1635–45; < French lampon]
lam•poon′er, lam•poon′ist, n.

lampoon


Past participle: lampooned
Gerund: lampooning

Imperative
lampoon
lampoon
Present
I lampoon
you lampoon
he/she/it lampoons
we lampoon
you lampoon
they lampoon
Preterite
I lampooned
you lampooned
he/she/it lampooned
we lampooned
you lampooned
they lampooned
Present Continuous
I am lampooning
you are lampooning
he/she/it is lampooning
we are lampooning
you are lampooning
they are lampooning
Present Perfect
I have lampooned
you have lampooned
he/she/it has lampooned
we have lampooned
you have lampooned
they have lampooned
Past Continuous
I was lampooning
you were lampooning
he/she/it was lampooning
we were lampooning
you were lampooning
they were lampooning
Past Perfect
I had lampooned
you had lampooned
he/she/it had lampooned
we had lampooned
you had lampooned
they had lampooned
Future
I will lampoon
you will lampoon
he/she/it will lampoon
we will lampoon
you will lampoon
they will lampoon
Future Perfect
I will have lampooned
you will have lampooned
he/she/it will have lampooned
we will have lampooned
you will have lampooned
they will have lampooned
Future Continuous
I will be lampooning
you will be lampooning
he/she/it will be lampooning
we will be lampooning
you will be lampooning
they will be lampooning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been lampooning
you have been lampooning
he/she/it has been lampooning
we have been lampooning
you have been lampooning
they have been lampooning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been lampooning
you will have been lampooning
he/she/it will have been lampooning
we will have been lampooning
you will have been lampooning
they will have been lampooning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been lampooning
you had been lampooning
he/she/it had been lampooning
we had been lampooning
you had been lampooning
they had been lampooning
Conditional
I would lampoon
you would lampoon
he/she/it would lampoon
we would lampoon
you would lampoon
they would lampoon
Past Conditional
I would have lampooned
you would have lampooned
he/she/it would have lampooned
we would have lampooned
you would have lampooned
they would have lampooned

lampoon

A satire ridiculing a person.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lampoon - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous waylampoon - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous way
caricature, impersonation, imitation - a representation of a person that is exaggerated for comic effect
Verb1.lampoon - ridicule with satire; "The writer satirized the politician's proposal"
blackguard, guy, jest at, laugh at, make fun, poke fun, ridicule, roast, rib - subject to laughter or ridicule; "The satirists ridiculed the plans for a new opera house"; "The students poked fun at the inexperienced teacher"; "His former students roasted the professor at his 60th birthday"

lampoon

verb
1. ridicule, mock, mimic, parody, caricature, send up (Brit. informal), take off (informal), make fun of, squib, burlesque, satirize, pasquinade He was lampooned for his short stature and political views.
noun
1. satire, parody, caricature, send-up (Brit. informal), takeoff (informal), skit, squib, burlesque, pasquinade his scathing lampoons of consumer culture

lampoon

noun
A work, as a novel or play, that exposes folly by the use of humor or irony:
Translations

lampoon

[læmˈpuːn]
A. Nsátira f
B. VTsatirizar

lampoon

[læmˈpuːn] npamphlet mlamp-post lamppost [ˈlæmppəʊst] n (British)réverbère m

lampoon

lampoon

[læmˈpuːn]
1. nsatira
References in classic literature ?
The appropriate metre was also here introduced; hence the measure is still called the iambic or lampooning measure, being that in which people lampooned one another.
The message in the song lampooned the state of our democracy, a message our media has long carried.
MOVED on from being lampooned because of his penalty shoot-out miss in Euro '96 to being lampooned as national team manager.
COVENTRY Labour councillors once lampooned rising Tory stars Kevin Foster and Gary Ridley with a mocked up poster of them as Jedward.
CAIRO - A prominent Egyptian satirist has been fined millions of dollars over a dispute with a television channel which suspended his show after it lampooned military leaders, officials said Tuesday.
Many is the time when Nicholas has lampooned Newcastle United owner Mike Ashley (which is all water off a duck's back) and poked fun at goings-on at the club.
"I love other people being lampooned, I really don't take exception to the lads doing it but I think they are very good.
PRINCE CHARLES is an Aston-Martin-driving environmentalist who deserves to be lampooned mercilessly, according to a Cardiff-based political commentator.
The 45-year-old star refrained from any of the lively stunts that he has been lampooned for recently while he met the crowd at the world premiere of Lions For Lambs.
Patent medicines were products, usually with trademarks rather than patents, that were sold in elaborate road shows--road shows lampooned in movies and cartoons in the 1930s.
The Krewe du Vieux, one of the carnival's earliest parades, which is known for satire, lampooned Katrina and public officials blamed for the bungled response to the catastrophe in the parade themed 'C'est Levee,' a play on the French phrase meaning 'that's life.'
Grant for preserving the Union (he eventually published the statesman's best-selling memoirs); wrote in favor of rights for African Americans but was fond of telling racist jokes (and co-authored with Bret Harte the grotesquely anti-Chinese play Ah Sin); assailed the Gilded Age yet formed a close personal and professional relationship with the robber baron Henry Rogers; lampooned con men and scam artists yet went broke by investing in crackpot inventions and get-rich-quick schemes; and SO on.