lamprophyre


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to lamprophyre: Ijolite

lam·pro·phyre

 (lăm′prə-fīr′)
n.
A dark igneous rock, having porphyritic texture, in which both the phenocrysts and the matrix consist of hornblende, pyroxene, and biotite.

[German Lamprophyr : Greek lampros, clear (from lampein, to shine) + French porphyre, porphyry (from Old French porfire; see porphyry).]

lamprophyre

(ˈlæmprəˌfaɪə)
n
(Geological Science) any of a group of basic igneous rocks consisting of feldspathoids and ferromagnesian minerals, esp biotite: occurring as dykes and minor intrusions
[C19: from Greek lampros bright + -phyre, from porphyry]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Jongju Complex consists of six elongated multiple intrusions, mainly alkali pyroxenite, orthoclase pyroxenite, alkali gabbro, pegmatite and lamprophyre.
It is dominated by a granodiorite phase and is cross-cut by some later trachytic, doleritic, and lamprophyre dikes.
Dikes in the area were described by Nichols (1956) as lamprophyre (see also Skehan and Rast 1990).
In addition to these marginal faults there are several interbasinal gravity faults within the basin resulting in dislocation of coal seams and also dolerite dykes and sills of mica lamprophyre (Ghosh and Mukhopadhyay, 1985).
4 Ma, while lamprophyre CR 573 and basalt CR 564 yield whole-rock ages of 128.
There are a series lamprophyre dykes on ground acquired five years ago by a series of companies but data hasn't been submitted, "so we don't know what was found," says Pace.
Deformations of lamprophyre dykes 28-26 Ma in age along a NW-SE-striking transtensional zone related to this fault are visible in the Techlovice quarries (Cajz and Adamovic, 2003) and correspond to E-W extension.
2000b), lamprophyre magma in the Moldanubian Zone was separated from a hydrated lithospheric mantle as a result of thickening of the crust and of intensive melting of subducted deeper parts of lithospheric crust and rocks at the crust/mantle boundary.
It is also older than ages reported for lamprophyre dykes elsewhere in central and southeastern New England, and if correct, indicates that alkaline magmatism in