lancelet


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lance·let

 (lăns′lĭt)
n.
Any of various small chordate marine organisms of the subphylum Cephalochordata, having a long thin body with a notochord but no cranium or vertebrae, and usually found buried in sand. Also called amphioxus, cephalochordate.

lancelet

(ˈlɑːnslɪt)
n
(Animals) any of several marine animals of the genus Branchiostoma (formerly Amphioxus), esp B. lanceolatus, that are closely related to the vertebrates: subphylum Cephalochordata (cephalochordates). Also called: amphioxus
[C19: referring to the slender shape]

lance•let

(ˈlæns lɪt, ˈlɑns-)

n.
any small, lancet-shaped burrowing marine animal of the subphylum Cephalochordata, having a notochord and numerous gill slits. Also called amphioxus.
[1565–75]

lance·let

(lăns′lĭt)
Any of various small, transparent, fish-like animals that live in water and have a structure similar to that of vertebrates, but with a notochord instead of a true backbone. Lancelets are cephalochordates. Also called amphioxus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lancelet - small translucent lancet-shaped burrowing marine animallancelet - small translucent lancet-shaped burrowing marine animal; primitive forerunner of the vertebrates
cephalochordate - fish-like animals having a notochord rather than a true spinal column
genus Amphioxus - type genus of the Amphioxidae
References in periodicals archive ?
An international team of researchers analyzed the amphioxus, also known as lancelet - a living fossil, of sorts, that was long considered to be a faceless and brainless fish.
Amphioxus or lancelet belongs to the subphylum Cephalochordata, an extant representative of the most basal chordates.
A new species of lancelet, Branchiostoma longirostrum (order Amphioxi), from the western North Atlantic.
Zhu, C, Jin-Nan, W, Guo-Xia, M & Yan-Shen, Z 2013, 'China tackles the health effects of air pollution', The Lancelet, vol.
Such a scenario would also explain why the lancelet amphioxus, a 'primitive' chordate, has a notochord with both cartilage and muscle.
The accuracy of the "VVTAK Connecting Bridges" algorithm has been checked in a set of 50 proteins from different types of organisms (human, lancelet, nematode, plants, yeast, archaea, and viruses) excluding bacteria.
An amphioxus (also called a lancelet), which is a very distant cousin to humans and other vertebrates.
I have my doubts about how much "puzzling" compositors went in for, since the instability of speech-prefixes in this instance is matched by an even greater instability in another play printed in Quarto in 1600 by James Roberts, not Valentine Simmes, The Merchant of Venice, where Lancelet appears variously as abbreviations of that name and "Clown," and where Shylock occasionally appears as "Iewe." In this case, compositorial practice interferes with what may have been the contents of the manuscript presented to the printing house, and in a third case, which 1 shall discuss in my forthcoming Arden edition of the play, appears to have led successive editors up the garden path.
These early ancestors of man, thus seen in the dim recesses of time, must have been as simply, or even still more simply organized than the lancelet or amphioxus.
They are now convinced the 2in-long Florida lancelet anchovy, which has hardly changed in more than 500million years, is descended from the earliest chordates, the group from which we are all descended.
This book discussion was especially personality driven since the main characters--Arthur, Gwenivere (Gwenhwyfar), Merlin, and Lancelot (Lancelet)--were so different from (and more complex than) the way they have traditionally been portrayed.
John Andrewes reminds us that so much of our modern interpretation of the play works from a playtext with "normalized" spellings that Shakespeare's audience may neither have read nor heard, that the "Lancelet" from the earliest printed versions of the play, for example, may not have sounded quite as "Englished" and Arthurian as the "Lancelot" as has been conjectured (166; Desai, 314).