lancers


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lanc·er

 (lăn′sər)
n.
1. A cavalryman armed with a lance.
2. A member of a regiment originally armed with lances.
3. lancers(used with a sing. verb)
a. A kind of quadrille.
b. The music for this dance.

[French lancier, from Old French, maker of lances, from lance, lance; see lance.]

lancers

(ˈlɑːnsəz)
n (functioning as singular)
1. (Dancing) a quadrille for eight or sixteen couples
2. (Music, other) a piece of music composed for this dance
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lancers - a quadrille for 8 or 16 couples
quadrille - a square dance of 5 or more figures for 4 or more couples
Translations

lancers

n sing (= dance)Lancier m, → Quadrille f
References in classic literature ?
A regiment of Lancers came charging down the Broad Walk, armed with holly-leaves, with which they jog the enemy horribly in passing.
Or, being armed with their long keen whaling spears, they were as a picked trio of lancers; even as the harpooneers were flingers of javelins.
A world in which all those pretty and gracious women dwelt, among the figures of the waltz and the lancers, with chat between about the last instalment of 'The Newcomes,' was good enough world for me; I was only afraid it was too good.
The second squadron of the Lancers shot by, and there was the troop-horse, with his tail like spun silk, his head pulled into his breast, one ear forward and one back, setting the time for all his squadron, his legs going as smoothly as waltz music.
Eyes, ears, arms and legs were pierced; every inch of the poor writhing body that did not cover a vital organ became the target of the cruel lancers.
In the ballroom, meanwhile, the dancers were being formed into squares for the lancers. Arthur and Rachel, Susan and Hewet, Miss Allan and Hughling Elliot found themselves together.
you are forgetting Poniatowski's Red Lancers, the Cuirassiers, the Dragoons, and the whole boiling.
The troop of lancers came up, and one of them who was in advance began shouting to Don Quixote, "Get out of the way, you son of the devil, or these bulls will knock you to pieces!"
"I know I 've made a guy of myself; but Fan insisted on it, for fear you 'd be offended if I did n't go the first dance with you," said Tom, remorsefully, watching Polly as she settled the bow of her crushed sash, which Tom had used as a sort of handle by which to turn and twist her; "I can do the Lancers tip-top; but you won't ever want to dance with me any more," he added, as he began to fan her so violently, that her hair flew about as if in a gale of wind.
"And I have one hundred archers and a score of lancers, but there are two hundred men who wait for me on this side of the water upon the borders of Navarre."
"Ah, Mulcahy, you're in good time," he shouted, "We've got the route, and we're off on Thursday for a pic-nic wid the Lancers next door."
We were placed in line immediately behind the President and the Board of Overseers, and directly afterward the Governor of Massachusetts, escorted by the Lancers, arrived and took his place in the line of march by the side of President Eliot.