landler


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ländler

(German ˈlɛntlər)
n
1. (Dancing) an Austrian country dance in which couples spin and clap
2. (Music, other) a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance, in three-four time
[German, from dialect Landl Upper Austria]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.landler - music in triple time for dancing the landler
dance music - music to dance to
2.landler - a moderately slow Austrian country dance in triple time; involves spinning and clapping
contra danse, contradance, contredanse, country dancing, country-dance - a type of folk dance in which couples are arranged in sets or face one another in a line
References in periodicals archive ?
In an abrupt, discomfiting change of tone, the movement displays and immense array of landler and Viennese waltzes like in the procession of a carnival," QPO noted.
Reporting was contributed by Declan Walsh from Cairo, Neil MacFarquhar from Moscow, Nicholas Kulish from New York, Eric Schmitt from Washington and Mark Landler from Tokyo.
The Landler of Josef Lanner and the waltzes of Johann Strauss Sr.
Heralded by the whooping horn section, magnificently led by Elspeth Dutch, Mahler's stars really did dance to his rustic landler.
Silent Night' gets two treatments-one for soprano, alto, choir, and orchestra, is performed in the original German with a decidedly landler flavor.
by Mark Landler Random House, New York 2016, 350 pages, $27.
Her aggressiveness militarily] will likely set her apart from the Republican candidate she meets in the general election," Mark Landler wrote.
Landler states Obama and Clinton share a similar foreign policy outlook, but have very different views-based on their upbringings, experiences, and political worldviews--on the use of the military as an instrument of power.
Clinton and Obama have come to embody competing visions of America's role in the world: his vision restrained, inward looking, radical in its acknowledgement of limits; hers, hard-edged, pragmatic, unabashedly old-fashioned," writes Landler, a New York Times reporter who has covered both the State Department and the White House.
In a New York Times story titled "How Hillary Became a Hawk," correspondent Mark Landler described the occasion when Gates and Pacific Commander Adm.
The diplomatic narrative is laid out in "Alter Egos," by New York Times White House correspondent Mark Landler.