landlocked


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Related to landlocked: landlocked salmon

land·locked

 (lănd′lŏkt′)
adj.
1. Entirely or almost entirely surrounded by land: a landlocked country.
2. Remaining in inland waters through the entire life cycle. Used especially of an ordinarily anadromous or catadromous fish: landlocked salmon.

landlocked

(ˈlændˌlɒkt)
adj
1. (Physical Geography) (of a country) completely surrounded by land
2. (Physical Geography) (esp of lakes) completely or almost completely surrounded by land
3. (Zoology) (esp of certain salmon) living in fresh water that is permanently isolated from the sea

land•locked

(ˈlændˌlɒkt)

adj.
1. shut in completely, or almost completely, by land: a landlocked bay.
2. having no direct access to the sea.
3. living in waters shut off from the sea, as some fish.
[1615–25]

landlocked

Entirely surrounded by land, such as an inland sea or a country.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.landlocked - surrounded entirely or almost entirely by land; "a landlocked country"
inland - situated away from an area's coast or border
Translations
مُحاط باليابِسَه
obklopený pevninou
szárazfölddel körülvett
umkringdur landi
obklopený pevninou
kara ile çevrilmiş/kuşatılmış

landlocked

[ˈlændlɒkt] ADJsin acceso al mar

landlocked

[ˈlændlɒkt] adj [country, nation] → sans accès à la mer, enclavé(e)

landlocked

[ˈlændˌlɒkt] adjsenza sbocco sul mare

land

(lӕnd) noun
1. the solid part of the surface of the Earth which is covered by the sea. We had been at sea a week before we saw land.
2. a country. foreign lands.
3. the ground or soil. He never made any money at farming as his land was poor and stony.
4. an estate. He owns land/lands in Scotland.
verb
1. to come or bring down from the air upon the land. The plane landed in a field; They managed to land the helicopter safely; She fell twenty feet, but landed without injury.
2. to come or bring from the sea on to the land. After being at sea for three months, they landed at Plymouth; He landed the big fish with some help.
3. to (cause to) get into a particular (usually unfortunate) situation. Don't drive so fast – you'll land (yourself) in hospital/trouble!
ˈlanding noun
1. (an act of) coming or bringing to shore or to ground. an emergency landing; (also adjective) a landing place.
2. a place for coming ashore.
3. the level part of a staircase between flights of steps. Her room was on the first floor, across the landing from mine.
ˈlanding-gear noun
the parts of an aircraft that carry the load when it lands. The accident was caused by the failure of the plane's landing-gear.
ˈlanding-stage noun
a platform, fixed or floating, on which to land passengers or goods from a boat.
ˈlandlocked adjective
enclosed by land. a landlocked country; That area is completely landlocked.
ˈlandlordfeminine ˈlandlady (plural ˈlandladies) – noun
1. a person who has tenants or lodgers. My landlady has just put up my rent.
2. a person who keeps a public house. The landlord of the `Swan' is Mr Smith.
ˈlandmark noun
1. an object on land that serves as a guide to seamen or others. The church-tower is a landmark for sailors because it stands on the top of a cliff.
2. an event of great importance.
land mine
a mine laid on or near the surface of the ground, which is set off by something passing over it.
ˈlandowner noun
a person who owns land, especially a lot of land.
ˈLandrover® (-rouvə) noun
a type of strong motor vehicle used for driving over rough ground.
ˈlandslide noun
a piece of land that falls down from the side of a hill. His car was buried in the landslide.
ˈlandslide (victory) noun
a clear victory in an election. Their political party won a landslide victory.
ˈlandslide defeat noun
a clear defeat in an election.
land up
to get into a particular, usually unfortunate, situation, especially through one's own fault. If you go on like that, you'll land up in jail.
land with
to burden (someone) with (an unpleasant task). She was landed with the job of telling him the bad news.
see how the land lies
to take a good look at the circumstances before making a decision.
References in classic literature ?
For a ship with her sails furled on her squared yards, and reflected from truck to water-line in the smooth gleaming sheet of a landlocked harbour, seems, indeed, to a seaman's eye the most perfect picture of slumbering repose.
And really, looking at that place, landlocked from the sea and shut off from the land by the precipitous slopes of mountains, it was difficult to believe in the existence of any neighbourhood.
It had been built upon a beautiful, natural harbor, landlocked by magnificent hills.
The Firth of Forth (as is very well known) narrows at this point to the width of a good-sized river, which makes a convenient ferry going north, and turns the upper reach into a landlocked haven for all manner of ships.
As we were in search of pure water, we did not wish to overlook any portion of the coast, and so after sounding and finding that we had ample depth, I ran the U-33 between head-lands into as pretty a landlocked harbor as sailormen could care to see, with good water right up to within a few yards of the shore.
Before him lay what appeared to be the entrance to a little, landlocked harbor.
On the placid waters of the landlocked harbor floated a great ship, and on the beach a small boat was drawn up.
You would not have guessed that in infancy he had suckled at the breast of a hideous, hairy she-ape, nor that in all his conscious past since his parents had passed away in the little cabin by the landlocked harbor at the jungle's verge, he had known no other associates than the sullen bulls and the snarling cows of the tribe of Kerchak, the great ape.
'Landlocked countries are to share in fisheries cash and while European fleets are being built up, Scottish boats are going bust.
Like its Central Asian neighbours, landlocked Uzbekistan is eager to have pipelines to export oil and gas to world markets.
This landlocked country is sandwiched between -- to the north, and -- to the south.
Fine Gael argues that Mr McHugh, from landlocked Ballandine, Co Mayo, must make a 300-mile trip from one side of the country to the other in order to attend each meeting.