langouste


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lan·gouste

 (läN-go͞ost′)
[French, from Old French, from Old Provençal langosta, from Vulgar Latin *lacusta, from Latin locusta, lobster, locust.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

langouste

(ˈlɒŋɡuːst; lɒŋˈɡuːst)
n
(Animals) another name for the spiny lobster
[French, from Old Provençal langosta, perhaps from Latin lōcusta lobster, locust]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

spin′y lob′ster


n.
any of several edible crustaceans of the family Palinuridae, differing from true lobsters in having a spiny shell and lacking large pincers.
[1810–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.langouste - warm-water lobsters without clawslangouste - warm-water lobsters without claws; those from Australia and South Africa usually marketed as frozen tails; caught also in Florida and California
sea crawfish, spiny lobster, langouste, rock lobster, crawfish, crayfish - large edible marine crustacean having a spiny carapace but lacking the large pincers of true lobsters
shellfish - meat of edible aquatic invertebrate with a shell (especially a mollusk or crustacean)
2.langouste - large edible marine crustacean having a spiny carapace but lacking the large pincers of true lobsterslangouste - large edible marine crustacean having a spiny carapace but lacking the large pincers of true lobsters
lobster - any of several edible marine crustaceans of the families Homaridae and Nephropsidae and Palinuridae
genus Palinurus, Palinurus - type genus of the family Palinuridae
crayfish, langouste, rock lobster, spiny lobster - warm-water lobsters without claws; those from Australia and South Africa usually marketed as frozen tails; caught also in Florida and California
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
L'Algerie importe quelque 40.000 tonnes et en exporte 2.000 tonnes de poissons nobles comme la langouste, le poulpe et la crevette royale.
Next is Ravioli Langouste with Langousteoursin sauce or Seared Scallops with Langousteoursin sauce.
La peche a la langouste dans les iles du Pacifique: fortune ou faillite?
In homage to Manzi's, One Leicester Street retains the shuttered restaurant's beloved signage--large-scale renditions of the words "Moules," "Huitres," and "Langouste"--referencing the past even as it elegantly modernizes the building.
Proust ascribes to her a remark from an unrelated cookbook, Almanach des bonnes choses de France (Emilie de Clermont-Tonnerre), that "la demoiselle de Caen, qui n'est qu'une langouste plus petite et plus fine, est tres bonne grillee" ["the demoiselle de Caen, which is but a langouste that is very small and very delicate, is very good when grilled"].
L'Union europeenne a reduit ses tarifs douaniers sur la langouste d'Australie, desormais alignes sur ceux des langoustes originaires du Canada et des Etats-Unis.
Another introduction was "Langouste, Saint-Jacques et empereur en nage de vanille et agrumes (Lobster, scallops, and emperor fish in court bouillon with vanilla and citrus fruit).
Sometimes referred to as rock lobster or langouste, it is generally found in warmer waters.
Expect everything from empty bird's nests and a langouste la Parisienne to a pyramid of jawless skulls.