language isolate


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language isolate

n.
A language that has no known linguistic affiliation with any other language, such as Basque or Tarascan.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
isolaattikieli
References in periodicals archive ?
Known as 'language isolate' among linguists for its unique features, Brushaski still remains to be classified under any specific family of languages.
It now appears to be a language isolate, and has no demonstrable genetic relatives in West Africa, say Heath and Hantgan, though the people consider themselves to be Dogon culturally.
After its fall, the language isolate speaking Gutians, a pre-Iranic race from Ancient Iran, over-ran the region for a few decades, making Arrapha their capital, before being ejected from Mesopotamia by Sumerians during the Neo-Sumerian Empire (2112-2004 BC).
Brahui is a language isolate. This means that it is isolated from other languages of its family, i.e.
Because it is the only remaining pre-Roman language in Europe, it is a language isolate with no known relatives and uncertain origins, probably a descendent of the Aquitanian language.
A language isolate, unrelated to any other known human speech form, Kusunda was until recently believed to be extinct.
Organized alphabetically by tribe or group, there is at least one representative Native American tribe from each language family or language isolate for each culture area covered.
Kootenay is a language isolate -- one that is not known to be related to any other language.
Nichols' paper goes even further, surveying "every language family and language isolate attested for North America, excluding only those six ...
One of Garza's goals is to contribute to the understanding of the principles and constraints that illustrate the resources of a language to generate complex constructions such as three-argument events, and she does so in a study of syntactic transitivity in P'orhepecha, a Mesoamerican language isolate. Her analysis focuses primarily on the morphosyntactic properties of sentences with two or more non-agent arguments.
In addition, small groups of language isolates such as Burusho and Dravidian (speakers of which include the Brahui people) can also be found.
This is well attested and known in a variety of genetic grouping such as Samoyedic, Turkic, and Tungusik, but among the studies here are demonstrations that they also appear in some of the region's language isolates, such as Ket and Ainu.

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