languishingly


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lan·guish

 (lăng′gwĭsh)
intr.v. lan·guished, lan·guish·ing, lan·guish·es
1. To be or become weak or feeble; lose strength or vigor: crops languishing from a lack of rain.
2. To exist or continue in miserable or disheartening conditions: languished away in prison.
3. To remain unattended or be neglected: legislation that continued to languish in committee.
4. To become downcast or pine away in longing: languish apart from friends and family; languish for a change from dull routine.

[Middle English languishen, from Old French languir, languiss-, from Latin languēre, to be languid; see slēg- in Indo-European roots.]

lan′guish·er n.
lan′guish·ing·ly adv.
lan′guish·ment n.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
He kept the book open at the bewitching portrait, and looked at it rather languishingly.
But Fayaway, holding in her delicately formed olive hand the long yellow reed of her pipe, with its quaintly carved bowl, and every few moments languishingly giving forth light wreaths of vapour from her mouth and nostrils, looked still more engaging.
I'm sure,' said the Good Sport, languishingly, like a sentimental siege-gun, 'that if I had ever met Mr Chalmers before I shouldn't have forgotten him.