langur

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lan·gur

 (läng-go͝or′)
n.
Any of various leaf-eating Asian monkeys of the genera Presbytis, Semnopithecus, and Trachypithecus, having a slender body and a long tail. Also called leaf monkey.

[Hindi laṅgūr, perhaps from Sanskrit lāṅgūlam, tail.]

langur

(lʌŋˈɡʊə)
n
(Animals) any of various agile arboreal Old World monkeys of the genus Presbytis and related genera, of S and SE Asia having a slender body, long tail and hands, and long hair surrounding the face
[Hindi, perhaps related to Sanskrit lāngūla tailed]

lan•gur

(lʌŋˈgʊər)

n.
any slender, long-tailed, leaf-eating monkey of the genus Presbytis, of S Asia.
[1820–30; < Hindi laṅgūr]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.langur - slender long-tailed monkey of Asialangur - slender long-tailed monkey of Asia  
catarrhine, Old World monkey - of Africa or Arabia or Asia; having nonprehensile tails and nostrils close together
entellus, Presbytes entellus, Semnopithecus entellus, hanuman - langur of southern Asia; regarded as sacred in India
Translations

langur

n (Zool) → Langur m
References in classic literature ?
The langurs, the big gray-whiskered monkeys of the Himalayas, were, naturally, the first, for they are alive with curiosity; and when they had upset the begging-bowl, and rolled it round the floor, and tried their teeth on the brass-handled crutch, and made faces at the antelope skin, they decided that the human being who sat so still was harmless.
The villagers saw the outline of the barasingh stalking like a shadow through the dark forest behind the shrine; saw the minaul, the Himalayan pheasant, blazing in her best colours before Kali's statue; and the langurs on their haunches, inside, playing with the walnut shells.
The fields changed their colours with the seasons; the threshing-floors filled and emptied, and filled again and again; and again and again, when winter came, the langurs frisked among the branches feathered with light snow, till the mother-monkeys brought their sad-eyed little babies up from the warmer valleys with the spring.
He heard, though he could not see, the langurs pressing about him, and behind them the uhh
They saw the barasingh standing over him, who fled when they came near, and they heard the langurs wailing in the branches, and Sona moaning up the hill; but their Bhagat was dead, sitting cross-legged, his back against a tree, his crutch under his armpit, and his face turned to the north-east.
As he kneeled to throw fuel on the fire the langur ran to the door of the shrine, crooned and ran back again, plucking at the man's knee.
Out of 260 observed attacks, encounters and interactions, 34 Hanuman langurs were observed killed by different predators from 16 troops including 3 focal troops.
Baboons, gorillas, barbary apes, spider monkeys, woolly monkeys, rhesus monkeys, celebes monkeys, celeb monkeys (I'm thinking the one who hung around with Tarzan and that bloke which starred in Every Which Way But Loose), capuchins, tufted capuchins, tamarins, emperor tamarins, langurs, spectacled langurs, mandrills, mangabey, macaques, marmosets, howlers and - the very funkiest of the all, as immortalised by The Goodies' 1975 hit single - the gibbon.
Hunters reported (sometimes estimated) the numbers of animals seen at any one encounter, which might range from a solitary gibbon or hornbill to a troop of langurs or a horde of bulbuls.
The farther you penetrate, the more the forest awakens, as its inhabitants become aware of your presence: gibbons and langurs will call out to signal your arrival, but it takes an expert to catch a glimpse of them.
Throughout south and east Asia, for example, temples and sacred forest groves provide refuge for langurs and macaques, who are viewed as living emblems of the resident gods or spirits.