lantern


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lan·tern

 (lăn′tərn)
n.
1.
a. An often portable case with transparent or translucent sides for holding and protecting a light.
b. A decorative casing for a light, often of paper.
c. A light and its protective or decorative case.
2.
a. The room at the top of a lighthouse where the light is located.
b. Obsolete A lighthouse.
3. A structure built on top of a roof or dome with open or windowed walls to admit light and air.

[Middle English, from Old French lanterne, from Latin lanterna, from Greek lamptēr, from lampein, to shine.]

lantern

(ˈlæntən)
n
1. a light with a transparent or translucent protective case
2. a structure on top of a dome or roof having openings or windows to admit light or air
3. the upper part of a lighthouse that houses the light
4. (Photography) photog short for magic lantern
[C13: from Latin lanterna, from Greek lamptēr lamp, from lampein to shine]

lan•tern

(ˈlæn tərn)

n.
1. a transparent or translucent, usu. portable, case for enclosing a light and protecting it from the wind, rain, etc.
2. the chamber at the top of a lighthouse, surrounding the light.
4.
a. a structure with open or windowed sides on top of a roof or dome, admitting light or air to the enclosed area below.
b. any light, decorative structure of relatively small size crowning a roof, dome, etc.
[1250–1300; Middle English lanterne < Latin lanterna (< Etruscan) < Greek lamptḗr lamp, light]

lantern

- Traces back to Greek lucerna, "lamp."
See also related terms for lamp.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lantern - light in a transparent protective caselantern - light in a transparent protective case
Chinese lantern - a collapsible paper lantern in bright colors; used for decorative purposes
bull's-eye, dark lantern - a lantern with a single opening and a sliding panel that can be closed to conceal the light
jack-o'-lantern - lantern carved from a pumpkin
lamp - an artificial source of visible illumination

lantern

noun lamp, light, torch, flashlight She took out a lantern and struck a match.
Translations
فانوس
lucerna
lanterne
lanterno
lámpás
lampiljósker
žibintuvas
lākturislaterna
lucerna
fenjer

lantern

[ˈlæntən]
A. Nfarol m, linterna f (Archit) → linterna f (Naut) → faro m, farol m; [of lighthouse] → fanal m
B. CPD lantern lecture Nconferencia f con diapositivas
lantern slide Ndiapositiva f

lantern

[ˈlæntərn] nlanterne f

lantern

n (also Archit) → Laterne f ? Chinese lantern

lantern

:
lantern-jawed
adjhohlwangig
lantern slide
nGlasdiapositiv nt, → Lichtbild nt

lantern

[ˈlæntən] nlanterna

lantern

(ˈlӕntən) noun
a case for holding or carrying a light.

lantern

n. linterna, farol.
References in classic literature ?
Suddenly, the darkness was made visible by a small dark lantern and Raoul instinctively stepped backward as though to escape the scrutiny of a secret enemy.
He then lighted a lantern and with the eldest daughter, Martha, who insisted on accompanying him, went in search.
Tom slipped out in good season with his aunt's old tin lantern, and a large towel to blindfold it with.
They entered; behind a glass window, by the light of the cardinal's lantern, which had been placed on the floor in the midst of the gallery, they saw the orange and pomegranate trees of the Castle of Rueil, in long lines, forming one great alley and two smaller side alleys.
Before I could knock at the door it was suddenly opened, and a man came running out with a lighted lantern in his hand.
What was the stupefaction of the friendly movers when this object at last emerging, proved to be a much-dilapidated dark lantern!
As it drew near he perceived it came from a lantern in the bow of a boat gliding along under shadow of the land.
So he placed Dorothy upon one side of him and the boy upon the other and set a lantern upon each of their heads.
Old Tom, with almost equal precipitation, handed his lantern to Miss Polly, and followed his son.
Oolanga, having tried standing tiptoe on the highest point near, and holding the lantern as high as he could, threw the light round the edges of the door to see if he could find anywhere a hole or a flaw in the metal through which he could obtain a glimpse.
Daddy Jacques flew to the kitchen and returned with a lantern. He held it close to the face of the dead shadow, and we recognised the keeper, the man called by the landlord of the Donjon Inn the Green Man, whom, an hour earlier, I had seen come out of Arthur Rance's chamber carrying a parcel.
My jailers, however, had been kind enough to leave me a lantern, which, set upon the ground (like my mattress), would afford a warning, if not a protection, against the worst; unless I slept; and as yet I had not lain down.