laogai


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laogai

(ˈlaʊˌɡaɪ)
n
(Law) a forced labour camp in China, run as part of its criminal justice system

lao•gai

(ˈlaʊˈgaɪ)
n.
the system of forced-labor camps, prisons, etc., in China.
[1990–95; < Chinese: literally, reform through labor]
References in periodicals archive ?
Much of the money set aside for the Yahoo Human Rights Trust Fund were diverted to the Laogai Human Rights Organization and the Laogai Research Foundation, both (https://projects.
Burma's Commander-in-Chief Snr-Gen Min Aung Hlaing says there is "no prospect for peace" with the ethnic Kokang militants of the Myanmar National Democratic Alliance Army (MNDA) as it was they who provoked fighting in Laogai by attacking government forces first.
Sponsored by the Pioneer Institute and several partner organizations, it featured three Pulitzer Prize-winning authors -- Anne Applebaum, Edmund Morris and William Taubman -- as well as a pair of retired social studies teachers, JFK Library Director Thomas Putnam, and Harry Wu, the founder and director of the Laogai Research Foundation, and a man who survived 19 years in Chinese prison camps.
15) See for example, "Wishful Thinking: Tibet in the Face of Communist China's War against Autonomy," Laogai Research Foundation.
Goods produced in China's Laogai forced labour camps "should not benefit from investments made under this bilateral investment agreement" say MEPs.
Beneath its veneer of modernity and order, Chinese politics is still a graft-ridden spoils game and the Communist Party, with its secret police and laogai, is still autocratic and unaccountable.
For foreign scholars, the distinction between laojiao and laogai is particularly confusing (Belkin 2000, 9).
It is extremely difficult to establish precisely which products imported from China into the EU have been manufactured in laogai," commented Fule.
The official informs the man that, according to the laws of communist China, if he prints one "unfavorable" word about the government, he will be placed in a laogai (a "reeducation" prison).
Small traders sell apples from China out of carts on the side of the road; the area's capital, Laogai, is a seedy town with open-air markets and several shabby casinos catering to local tourists.
The text of Laogai discusses in depth human rights problems deeply affecting China, from issues of freedom of expression to religious freedom, police brutality, and the omnipresent threat of ruthless state execution.
Myanmar groups in exile say the fighting began after the Myanmar military took control of facilities run by the Kokang Myanmar National Democratic Alliance Army (MNDAA), in Laogai, the capital of Shan.