laparotomy

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lap·a·rot·o·my

 (lăp′ə-rŏt′ə-mē)
n. pl. lap·a·rot·o·mies
Surgical incision into the abdominal wall, especially into the flank.

[Greek laparā, flank; see laparoscope + -tomy.]

laparotomy

(ˌlæpəˈrɒtəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
1. (Surgery) surgical incision through the abdominal wall, esp to investigate the cause of an abdominal disorder
2. (Surgery) surgical incision into the loin
[C19: from Greek lapara flank, from laparos soft + -tomy]

lap•a•rot•o•my

(ˌlæp əˈrɒt ə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
a surgical incision through the abdominal wall.
[1875–80]

laparotomy

Surgery to make an incision in the abdominal wall for surgery.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.laparotomy - surgical incision into the abdominal wall; often done to examine abdominal organs
surgical incision, incision, section - the cutting of or into body tissues or organs (especially by a surgeon as part of an operation)
laparoscopy - laparotomy performed with a laparoscope that makes a small incision to examine the abdominal cavity (especially the ovaries and Fallopian tubes)
Translations

laparotomy

[ˌlæpəˈrɒtəmɪ] Nlaparotomía f

laparotomy

nLaparotomie f

lap·a·rot·o·my

n. laparotomía, incisión y abertura del abdomen.

laparotomy

n (pl -mies) laparotomía; exploratory — laparotomía exploradora
References in periodicals archive ?
Objective: To determine the mean post-operative pain in scalpel versus diathermy opening of midline laparotomies.
This study focuses specifically on patients who required two or more repeat laparotomies and describes the spectrum of disease necessitating repeat laparotomy and the associated outcomes.
Interrupted-X closure thus becomes the preferred method for abdominal fascia closure for exploratory laparotomies.
Modified midline abdominal wound closure technique in complicated/high risk laparotomies.
Our patient had undergone exploratory laparotomies three times in the past for gastric ulcer with bleeding, dialytic tube implantation and removal.
Colorectal surgery and repeat laparotomies are at particularly high risk for postoperative adhesions (Bhardwaj & Parker 2007) and made up 32.
Thus, in a stable patient laparoscopy has the advantage of diagnostic accuracy and can help to avoid non-therapeutic laparotomies in up to 40% of patients.
The 38 patients who had laparotomies underwent surgery from 2003 to 2005, when this was the standard approach at the hospital.
Preoperative accurate diagnosis prevents from unnecessary laparotomies and results in reducing negative operations (Saleh M Abbas, 2007:5).
Surgeons-in-training were the first operators in more than 50% of the laparotomies and 25% of thoracotomies.