lapidary

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lap·i·dar·y

 (lăp′ĭ-dĕr′ē)
n. pl. lap·i·dar·ies
1. One who cuts, polishes, or engraves gems.
2. A dealer in precious or semiprecious stones.
adj.
1. Of or relating to precious stones or the art of working with them.
2.
a. Engraved in stone.
b. Marked by conciseness, precision, or refinement of expression: lapidary prose.
c. Sharply or finely delineated: a face with lapidary features.

[Middle English lapidarie, from Old French lapidaire, from Latin lapidārius, from lapis, lapid-, stone.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lapidary

(ˈlæpɪdərɪ)
n, pl -daries
1. (Professions) a person whose business is to cut, polish, set, or deal in gemstones
2. (Jewellery) a person whose business is to cut, polish, set, or deal in gemstones
adj
3. (Jewellery) of or relating to gemstones or the work of a lapidary
4. (Jewellery) Also: lapidarian engraved, cut, or inscribed in a stone or gemstone
5. of sufficiently high quality to be engraved on a stone: a lapidary inscription.
[C14: from Latin lapidārius, from lapid-, lapis stone]
ˌlapiˈdarian adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lap•i•dar•y

(ˈlæp ɪˌdɛr i)

n., pl. -dar•ies,
adj. n.
1. Also, lap′i•dist. a worker who cuts, polishes, and engraves precious stones.
2. Also, la•pid•ar•ist (ləˈpɪd ər ɪst) an expert in precious stones and the art or techniques used in cutting and engraving them.
3. the art of cutting, polishing, and engraving precious stones.
4. an old book on the lore of gems.
adj.
5. of or pertaining to the cutting or engraving of precious stones.
6. characterized by an exactitude and extreme refinement that suggests gem cutting: a lapidary style; lapidary verse.
7. of, pertaining to, or suggestive of inscriptions on stone monuments.
Also, lap•i•dar•i•an (ˌlæp ɪˈdɛər i ən)
[1325–75; Middle English lapidarie (n.) < Latin lapidārius of stone, stone-cutter =lapid-, s. of lapis stone + -ārius -ary]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

lapidary

1. one who cuts, polishes, or engraves precious stones.
2. a cutter of gemstones, especially diamonds.
3. the art of cutting gemstones.
4. a connoisseur of cut gemstones and the art of their cutting. — lapidarist, n.lapidarian, adj.
See also: Gems
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lapidary - an expert on precious stones and the art of cutting and engraving them
expert - a person with special knowledge or ability who performs skillfully
2.lapidary - a skilled worker who cuts and engraves precious stones
engraver - a skilled worker who can inscribe designs or writing onto a surface by carving or etching
Adj.1.lapidary - of or relating to precious stones or the art of working with them; "the ring is of no lapidary value"- Lord Byron; "lapidary art"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

lapidary

[ˈlæpɪdərɪ]
A. ADJlapidario
B. Nlapidario/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lapidary

adj lapidary art(Edel)steinschneidekunst f; lapidary inscriptionin Stein gehauene Inschrift
nSteinschneider(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
"Tell me, Anselmo, if Heaven or good fortune had made thee master and lawful owner of a diamond of the finest quality, with the excellence and purity of which all the lapidaries that had seen it had been satisfied, saying with one voice and common consent that in purity, quality, and fineness, it was all that a stone of the kind could possibly be, thou thyself too being of the same belief, as knowing nothing to the contrary, would it be reasonable in thee to desire to take that diamond and place it between an anvil and a hammer, and by mere force of blows and strength of arm try if it were as hard and as fine as they said?
He said for promoting exports we also have to introduce latest technologies for mining, cutting and polishing, lapidaries and internationally aggregated labs to ensure the quality of the products.
Emeralds were imported from Colombia by Portuguese and Spanish traders to India for Mughal patrons where they were polished and shaped by master lapidaries at the royal court.
Highly recommended for a narrow range of readers: biologists and law enforcement or conservation professionals dealing with the trade in animal parts, antique experts, museum professionals, or jewelers and lapidaries who identify and restore old objects or work with animal materials, and lovers of the British antiquarian tradition.
They are typically untreated, although some lapidaries may stabilize them with Opticon.
The book is designed for geologists and mineral fans rather than lapidaries and gem fans, but it gives some useful information on what the occasionally bewildering traditional gem names refer to, as well as photos of rough specimens of gem and non-gem varieties of quartz.
The AGTA GemFair Tucson is well-known for its Spectrum Award (established in 1984 to recognize exceptionally fine jewelry created by artists) and for its Cutting Edge Award (established in 1991 for gemstone designers and lapidaries), and it also bills itself as "The Voice of the natural gemstone, pearl and cultured pearl industry." The AGTA achieves its aims through educational programs, industry events and industry relations while maintaining high ethical standards.
Although ancient and medieval lapidaries listed properties of gems in the form of a mystical catalogue, Barbey's allusions to individual jewels are subtle and scattered, like reflections through light.
Elsewhere, in Pearl, the Gawain-poet displays a positive fascination with the symbolism of precious metals and gems.(3) The abundance of medieval English lapidaries and treatises on the properties of metals suggests that the contemporary audience was far more likely than the modern reader to recognize any symbolism regarding the ring.
His other poetic works included didactic verse; Les Amours et nouveaux echanges des pierres precieuses (1576), a commentary on exotic stones and their inherent secret virtues written in the tradition of the medieval lapidaries; and La Reconnue (1577; "The Rediscovered Daughter"), a comedy in verse based on Plautus' Casina .
The Corporation has set up a topaz marketing centre to supply lapidaries with rough topaz from the deposit.