laps


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laps

more than one lap: She swam five laps in the pool. My cat sits in the laps of all of my guests whether they like her or not.
Not to be confused with:
lapse – a temporary deviation; a slip or error: a lapse of judgment; discontinuance due to a late payment: She let her insurance lapse.

lap 1

 (lăp)
n.
1.
a. The front area from the waist to the knees of a seated person.
b. The portion of a garment that covers the lap.
2. A hanging or flaplike part, especially of a garment.
3. An area of responsibility, interest, or control: an opportunity that dropped in his lap.
Idiom:
the lap of luxury
Conditions of great affluence or material comfort: an heiress living in the lap of luxury.

[Middle English lappe, lappet, lap, from Old English læppa, lappet.]

lap′ful′ n.

lap 2

 (lăp)
v. lapped, lap·ping, laps
v.tr.
1.
a. To place or lay (something) so as to overlap another: lapped the roof tiles so that water would run off.
b. To lie partly over or on: each shingle lapping the next; shadows that lapped the wall.
2. To fold (something) over onto itself: a cloth edge that had been lapped and sewn to make a hem.
3. To wrap or wind around (something); encircle.
4. To envelop in something; swathe: models who were lapped in expensive furs.
5. To join (pieces, as of wood) by means of a scarf or lap joint.
6. Sports To get ahead of (an opponent) in a race by one or more complete circuits of the course, as in running, or by two or more lengths of a pool in swimming.
7. To convert (cotton or other fibers) into a sheet or layer.
8.
a. To polish (a surface) until smooth.
b. To hone (two mating parts) against each other until closely fitted.
v.intr.
1. To lie partly on or over something; overlap.
2. To form a lap or fold.
3. To wind around or enfold something.
n.
1.
a. A part that overlaps.
b. The amount by which one part overlaps another.
2.
a. One complete round or circuit, especially of a racetrack.
b. One complete length of a straight course, as of a swimming pool.
3. A segment or stage, as of a trip.
4.
a. A length, as of rope, required to make one complete turn around something.
b. The act of lapping or encircling.
5. A continuous band or layer of cotton, flax, or other fiber.
6. A wheel, disk, or slab of leather or metal, either stationary or rotating, used for polishing and smoothing.

[Middle English lappen, from lappe, lap, lappet; see lap1.]

lap 3

 (lăp)
v. lapped, lap·ping, laps
v.tr.
1. To take in (a liquid or food) by lifting it with the tongue.
2. To wash or slap against with soft liquid sounds: waves lapping the side of the boat.
v.intr.
1. To take in a liquid or food with the tongue.
2. To wash against something with soft liquid sounds.
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of lapping.
b. The amount taken in by lapping.
2. The sound of lapping.
3. A watery food or drink.
Phrasal Verb:
lap up
To receive eagerly or greedily: lapping up praise.

[Middle English lapen, from Old English lapian.]
References in classic literature ?
The Lapdog jumped into his master's lap, and lay there blinking while the Farmer stroked his ears.
I was so small that, in order to negotiate the pail, I sat down and gathered it into my lap. First I sipped the foam.
She smiled to herself at vagrant impulses which arose from nowhere and suggested that she rumple his hair; while he desired greatly, when they tired of reading, to rest his head in her lap and dream with closed eyes about the future that was to be theirs.
The old poet seated himself beside his hearth, and took the little fellow on his lap; he squeezed the water out of his dripping hair, warmed his hands between his own, and boiled for him some sweet wine.
The writing-case was on her lap, with the letter and the pen lying on it.
"It isn't father and Priscilla?" said Nancy, with quivering lips, clasping her hands together tightly on her lap.
"To think that this is my twentieth birthday, and that I've left my teens behind me forever," said Anne, who was curled up on the hearth-rug with Rusty in her lap, to Aunt Jamesina who was reading in her pet chair.
Entering the room, they discovered through a thick cloud of tobacco smoke, a small, fat, bald-headed, dirty, old man, in an arm-chair, robed in a tattered flannel dressing-gown, with a short pipe in his mouth, a pug-dog on his lap, and a French novel in his hands.
Nevertheless she had an ear for the door, for when I bounced in she had been too clever for me; there was no book to be seen, only an apron on her lap and she was gazing out at the window.
At least I am, and nearly twenty years had elapsed, and here was I burdened under a load of affection, like a sack of returned love-letters, with no lap into which to dump them.
Miss Bridget did not, however, suffer her to continue long in this doubtful situation; for having looked some time earnestly at the child, as it lay asleep in the lap of Mrs Deborah, the good lady could not forbear giving it a hearty kiss, at the same time declaring herself wonderfully pleased with its beauty and innocence.
Besides the large box in which I was usually carried, the queen ordered a smaller one to be made for me, of about twelve feet square, and ten high, for the convenience of travelling; because the other was somewhat too large for Glumdalclitch's lap, and cumbersome in the coach; it was made by the same artist, whom I directed in the whole contrivance.