lares and penates


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lar·es and penates

 (lâr′ēz, lär′-)
pl.n.
Treasured household possessions.

[Partial translation of Latin Larēs et Penātēs, household gods : Larēs, pl. of Lār, Lar + et, and + Penātēs, Penates.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lares and penates

(ˈlɛəriːz; ˈlɑː-)
pl n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) Roman myth
a. household gods
b. statues of these gods kept in the home
2. the valued possessions of a household
[Latin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lar′es and pena′tes


n.pl.
the cherished possessions of a family or household.
[1765–75; < Latin Larēs(et)Penātēs]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

lares and penates

noun
One's portable property:
belonging (often used in plural), effect (used in plural), good (used in plural), personal effects, personal property, possession (used in plural), property, thing (often used in plural).
Informal: stuff.
Law: chattel, movable (often used in plural).
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Religion played a part in Horace's life--not the traditional religion of Rome, but recognition of the minor gods: Mercury, the god of culture, Venus, goddess of love, Bacchus, god of wine, and the household gods, the Lares and Penates. Eyres relates to this, swerving from traditional Christianity to Buddhism, which does not demand belief in any deity but seems to provide answers to anxiety in meditation and self-awareness.
Maggi analyzes familiar spirits as well, about whom the ancients talked (Lares and Penates), as, for instance, in earlier times, Socrates' demon, who is reflected in Girolamo Cardano's My Life, but is still mentioned by Jean Bodin, Johann Wier, and also by Andrea Vittorelli, author of a treaty on the guardian angels, Dei ministerii ed operazioni angeliche (1611).