largemouth


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largemouth

(ˈlɑːdʒˌmaʊθ)
n
(Animals) a largemouth bass
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.largemouth - a large black basslargemouth - a large black bass; the angle of the jaw falls behind the eye
black bass - widely distributed and highly prized American freshwater game fishes (sunfish family)
largemouth bass - flesh of largemouth bass
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The largemouth bass virus system may be a good general model for understanding the biology of other emerging viruses of wildlife, such as the West Nile virus, the Ebola virus and newly emerging viruses related to canine distemper.
No relationships were found between largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), the primary predator in these lakes, and pumpkinseed population characteristics.
Live fish are a major food item in the diet of the largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides (Howick and O'Brien, 1983).
In fact, the alarming reproductive problems of Florida's alligators may be surfacing in largemouth bass, a sign of widespread lake pollution.
Another day my wife and I can fly-fish for largemouth bass or tarpon or catch shrimp from the dock and cook them for dinner.
The compound, which encompasses guest cottages, riding stables, a trap range with clay pigeons, and lakes stocked with largemouth bass, is available for private use only.
The largemouth bass, a highly pugnacious fighter that becomes a water warrior when hooked, delivers a "reel" challenge to the angler.
A recent study examined population effects of catch-and-release bed fishing on nest and reproductive success of the Florida subspecies of largemouth bass in 1-acre ponds, some of which were fished and some which were not* In ponds that were fished, all active nests located by snorkelers were fished.
The late Jack Gartside's original version was his go-to striped bass fly, but he touted it for largemouth bass.
Suitability of nursery habitats for Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides) in coastal areas could change because of sea level rise (SLR) and effects on tides and increased erosion and saltwater intrusion into rivers (Short and Neckles, 1999; Titus and Richman, 2001; Hilton et al., 2008).
Looking in the very old Fishes of Rhodesia, the closest I came across is the Purpleface Largemouth. Is this correct?