largesse


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lar·gess

also lar·gesse  (lär-zhĕs′, -jĕs′, lär′jĕs′)
n.
1.
a. Liberality in bestowing gifts, especially in a lofty or condescending manner.
b. Money or gifts bestowed.
2. Generosity of spirit or attitude.

[Middle English largesse, from Old French, from large, generous, from Latin largus.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

largesse

(lɑːˈdʒɛs) or

largess

n
1. the generous bestowal of gifts, favours, or money
2. the things so bestowed
3. generosity of spirit or attitude
[C13: from Old French, from large]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.largesse - a gift or money given (as for service or out of benevolence); usually given ostentatiously
gift - something acquired without compensation
2.largesse - liberality in bestowing giftslargesse - liberality in bestowing gifts; extremely liberal and generous of spirit
liberality, liberalness - the trait of being generous in behavior and temperament
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

largesse

largess
noun
2. gift, present, grant, donation, endowment, bounty, bequest The president has been travelling around the country distributing largesse.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

largess

also largesse
noun
A material favor or gift, usually money, given in return for service:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

largesse

[lɑːˈʒes] Ngenerosidad f, liberalidad f; (= gift) → dádiva f espléndida
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

largesse

[lɑːrˈʒɛs] (British) largess (US) nlargesses fpl
grateful recipients of their largesse → les reconnaissants bénéficiaires de leurs largesses
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

largesse

nGroßzügigkeit f, → Freigebigkeit f; (= gift)(großzügige) Gabe
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

largesse

largess [lɑːˈdʒɛs] n (frm) → generosità
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Around him lacqueys fussed--placing chairs just behind where he was standing-- and clearing the spectators from his vicinity, so that he should have more room, and not be crowded--the whole done, of course, in expectation of a generous largesse. From time to time other gamblers would hand him part of their winnings--being glad to let him stake for them as much as his hand could grasp; while beside him stood a Pole in a state of violent, but respectful, agitation, who, also in expectation of a generous largesse, kept whispering to him at intervals (probably telling him what to stake, and advising and directing his play).
The heralds finished their proclamation with their usual cry of ``Largesse, largesse, gallant knights!'' and gold and silver pieces were showered on them from the galleries, it being a high point of chivalry to exhibit liberality towards those whom the age accounted at once the secretaries and the historians of honour.
de Beaufort, and are simply a volunteer, you must not reckon upon either pay or largesse. But I should not like you to want for anything at Gigelli.
The sailors, rejoicing in the largesses of the admiral, were heard murmuring their slow and artless songs.
Then, scattering apologies broadcast like a medieval monarch distributing largesse, Bill whirled his partner round by sheer muscular force and began what he intended to be a movement toward the farther corner, skirting the edge of the floor.
It is a most knightly largesse, and yet withouten money how can man rise?"
Kim slunk away, his teeth in the bread, and, as he expected, he found a small wad of folded tissue-paper wrapped in oilskin, with three silver rupees - enormous largesse. He smiled and thrust money and paper into his leather amulet-case.
Largesse, trained by John Berry, took the 12-furlong Konica East Doncaster Shield for the second year in succession.
(Largesse) Juskavitch, 43, of Chandler Street, Worcester, passed away, Sunday, April 1, 2007, in the Rose Monahan Hospice Residence on Coes Pond, after a long battle with cancer.
Ford has confirmed Brits won't be tempted by the same largesse because the company believes its current UK three-year, 36,000-mile warranty package "suits the kind of mileage done and coincides with the average time people keep a new car".
Largesse has been so convincing in his work at home for Oliver Sherwood since his jumping debut last month that he merits the nap in the Astaire & Partners Novices' Hurdle (4.30) at Uttoxeter today, writes Rodney Masters.
LEICESTER Helen Mildred (Bestick) Largesse, 88, of 611 Pleasant St.