larum


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lar·um

 (lăr′əm)
n. Archaic
1. A sound warning of danger.
2. A commotion.

[Middle English larum- (as in larumbelle, bell sounded for a call to arms), short for alarum; see alarum.]

larum

(ˈlærəm)
n
an archaic word for alarm
References in periodicals archive ?
Manager George Larum was pictured in the Evening Gazette saying farewell to the job he had done for the previous six years.
Crystal Lake Central -- Williams 1 0-0 2; Mendoza 2 2-2 7; Rennow 1 0-0 2; Lsedac 1 1-1 3; Pekora 2 1-2 5; Duncey 3 0-0 7; Larum 1 0-0 2; Timmerman 6 9-11 21.
Jules Larum Kirklees gave us a box for the glass bottles but then stopped collecting and told us to take it to the collection boxes either in the Aldi car park in Milnsbridge or near the Co-op at Crosland Moor.
clemson.edu/Essays/prosthesis larum/prosthesis larum.xhtml; Vin Nardizzi, 'The Wooden Matter of Human Bodies: Prosthesis and Stump in A Larum for London', The Indistinct Human in Renaissance Literature, ed.
Technicians Ryan Larum, Stacy Van Morter, and Matthew Weicker assisted on cruises and with video review.
They certainly focus on Tyndale's translation of the Bible into English, with notices that "the papists read the lives, stories, and gifts of men in the Bible as things no more pertaining unto them, then a tale of Robin Hood" (1573), and earlier emphases on the Pope's efforts to sell the people "a tale of Robin Hood" along with "pelting pardons" and "stinking Bulles of lead," which are interlarded with random references to the classical figures of Nero, Phallaris, Diocletian, Jupiter, and the Turks (John Phillips, A Friendly Larum against Papists, 1570).
The dramatists include William Shakespeare, Ben Jonson and Christopher Marlowe and some less widely known figures and plays such as the anonymous A Larum for London and George Gascoigne's The Glasse of Government.
As Doll exited stage right, King Henry, weak like Macbeth from lack of sleep, stumbled forward amid the tavern's trash and knelt, cursing the god of sleep and asking why he "liest with the vile / In loathsome beds, and leavest the kingly couch / A watch-case or a common 'larum bell?" (3.1.15-17).
Worth a listen Johnny Flynn - Been Listening VERDICT: Flynn emerged as the poster boy of nu-folk in 2008 with his debut Larum. Flynn, accompanied by The Sussex Wit, is back with more self-assured folk gems.
(33) Further, the way the poet describes the Mermedonians suggests that they are not monsters deprived of reason, but the worst kind of pagans, who follow a demonic inversion of a sacred rite; they believe (geliefad) in the devil, and "hira rood onwod / under dimscuan deofles larum" (140a-41) [their minds traveled into dark shadows by the devil's teachings].