larval therapy


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larval therapy

n
(Complementary Medicine) the use of maggots that feed on dead tissue to assist in the healing of serious wounds. An ancient practice, it has been revived in rare cases in which healing is hampered by the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics
References in periodicals archive ?
There is evidence in the literature on the successful use of larval therapy for traumatic wounds that fail to heal; postsurgical wound infections and perineal gangrene (Fournier's gangrene) have also been treated with maggot therapy after unsuccessful antibiotic and surgical treatments.
Derma Sciences is one of the key players in the global wound debridement products market, known for offering mechanical debridement pads, surgical wound debridement devices, and products used in traditional wound debridement and larval therapy.
Dressings for larval therapy need to be changed once daily, or twice daily if exudate is increased.
A possible risk for infection with Ignatzschineria exists with larval therapy, especially with I.
Some olden wound care practices have persisted through the years and one of these is larval therapy. Larval therapy or maggot debridement therapy or biosurgery is the therapeutic use of fly larvae to debride necrotic tissue [12].
Its larvae could produce facultative myiasis without affecting live tissue due to its feeding habits as a necrophagous species, thereby making them useful in larval therapy (LT).
BioMonde has developed an innovative larval therapy for hard-to-treat wounds which makes healing possible.
Maggot therapy (sometimes called larval therapy) is the application of live fly larvae to wounds in order to aid in wound debridement (cleaning), disinfection and/or healing.
The medicinal use of fly larvae to remove necrotic tissue has been referred to as biosurgery, maggot debridement therapy (MDT), larval debridement therapy (LDT), or just larval therapy. Typically, the larvae are only 2 mm long when first applied to the wound bed.
Ambrose Pare was the first to discover the benefits of larval therapy in 1557.
Carlos Brisola Marcondes recently (2009) published the book, Doencas Transmitidas e Causadas por Artropodes (Diseases Transmitted and Caused by Arthropods), and in 2006 Terapia Larval de Lesoes de Pele Causadas por Diabetes e Outras Doencas (Larval Therapy of Lesions Caused by Diabetes and Other Diseases).