videodisc

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Related to laser videodisc: Video Laser Discs

vid·e·o·disc

also vid·e·o·disk  (vĭd′ē-ō-dĭsk′)
n.
A disc on which sounds and images, as of a movie, are recorded.

[Originally a German trademark.]

vid•e•o•disc

(ˈvɪd i oʊˌdɪsk)

n.
an optical disc on which a motion picture or television program is recorded for playback on a television set.
Also called laser videodisc.
[1965–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.videodisc - a digital recording (as of a movie) on an optical disk that can be played on a computer or a television setvideodisc - a digital recording (as of a movie) on an optical disk that can be played on a computer or a television set
optical disc, optical disk - a disk coated with plastic that can store digital data as tiny pits etched in the surface; is read with a laser that scans the surface
Translations
videolemez
References in periodicals archive ?
Optical storage technology includes laser videodisc (LV), compact audio disc (CD), compact disc read-only memory (CD-ROM).
Laser videodisc is a state-of-the-art technology that requires a videodisc player, a remote-control unit, and a standard television set or monitor.
Planned and convened by Bruce Winter (Lorne Park Secondary School) and Judy Fink (Runnymede Collegiate) for the second year, session speakers examined laser videodisc technology, computer networking, Macintosh computers in school libraries, online and CD databases, and automated catalogs.
School librarians heard about the latest in laser videodisc technology, computer networking, Macintosh software, online and CD-ROM searching, automated catalogs, and the implications of the smart library in the schools.
AIMS programs are available in videocassette, DVD, laser videodisc, CD-ROM, and digital streaming video formats.
For example RLV, or recorded laser videodisc, is one way to create custom videodiscs.
Attendees heard about and saw a demonstration of a laser videodisc system in action, as if before now an analog technology did not qualify as multimedia even if it had a comparable installed base to CD-ROM.
A laser videodisc, which holds 54,000 frames, has only 30 minutes of video per side.
Technology The technology component of the earth science intervention is the laser videodisc.