lassitude


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Related to lassitude: anorexia

las·si·tude

 (lăs′ĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
A state or feeling of weariness, diminished energy, or listlessness. See Synonyms at lethargy.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin lassitūdō, from lassus, weary; see lē- in Indo-European roots.]

lassitude

(ˈlæsɪˌtjuːd)
n
physical or mental weariness
[C16: from Latin lassitūdō, from lassus tired]

las•si•tude

(ˈlæs ɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1. weariness of body or mind from strain, oppressive climate, etc.; listlessness; languor.
2. a condition of indolent indifference.
[1525–35; < Latin lassitūdō weariness]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lassitude - a state of comatose torpor (as found in sleeping sickness)
hebetude - mental lethargy or dullness
torpidity, torpor - a state of motor and mental inactivity with a partial suspension of sensibility; "he fell into a deep torpor"
2.lassitude - a feeling of lack of interest or energy
apathy - an absence of emotion or enthusiasm
3.lassitude - weakness characterized by a lack of vitality or energy
weakness - the property of lacking physical or mental strength; liability to failure under pressure or stress or strain; "his weakness increased as he became older"; "the weakness of the span was overlooked until it collapsed"

lassitude

lassitude

noun
Translations

lassitude

[ˈlæsɪtjuːd] Nlasitud f

lassitude

nMattigkeit f, → Trägheit f

lassitude

[ˈlæsɪtjuːd] n (frm) → apatia

las·si·tude

n. lasitud, languidez, agotamiento.
References in classic literature ?
Always on horseback, he had never known what lassitude was.
There are the spiritually consumptive ones: hardly are they born when they begin to die, and long for doctrines of lassitude and renunciation.
In good time, nevertheless, as the ardor of youth declines; as years and dumps increase; as reflection lends her solemn pauses; in short, as a general lassitude overtakes the sated Turk; then a love of ease and virtue supplants the love for maidens; our Ottoman enters upon the impotent, repentant, admonitory stage of life, forswears, disbands the harem, and grown to an exemplary, sulky old soul, goes about all alone among the meridians and parallels saying his prayers, and warning each young Leviathan from his amorous errors.
Her rapid footsteps shook her own floors, and she routed lassitude and indifference wherever she came.
Having finished my business, and feeling the lassitude and exhaustion incident to its dispatch, I felt that a protracted sea voyage would be both agreeable and beneficial, so instead of embarking for my return on one of the many fine passenger steamers I booked for New York on the sailing vessel Morrow, upon which I had shipped a large and valuable invoice of the goods I had bought.
Notwithstanding the lassitude and fatigue which oppressed him now, in common with his two companions, and indeed with all who had taken an active share in that night's work, Hugh's boisterous merriment broke out afresh whenever he looked at Simon Tappertit, and vented itself--much to that gentleman's indignation--in such shouts of laughter as bade fair to bring the watch upon them, and involve them in a skirmish, to which in their present worn-out condition they might prove by no means equal.
It was a day of lassitude too, hot and close, with, I am told, a rapidly fluctuating barometer.
However, on Saturday morning, Kennedy, as he awoke, complained of lassitude and feverish chills.
He gave an impression of lassitude, and his nickname was eminently appropriate.
Kutuzov still in the same place, his stout body resting heavily in the saddle with the lassitude of age, sat yawning wearily with closed eyes.
At length lassitude succeeded to the tumult I had before endured, and I threw myself on the bed in my clothes, endeavouring to seek a few moments of forgetfulness.
why will they hang about us, like the flavour of yesterday's wine, suggestive of headaches and lassitude, and those good intentions for the future, which, under the earth, form the everlasting pavement of a large estate, and, upon it, usually endure until dinner-time or thereabouts!