lassitude

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las·si·tude

 (lăs′ĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
A state or feeling of weariness, diminished energy, or listlessness. See Synonyms at lethargy.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin lassitūdō, from lassus, weary; see lē- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lassitude

(ˈlæsɪˌtjuːd)
n
physical or mental weariness
[C16: from Latin lassitūdō, from lassus tired]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

las•si•tude

(ˈlæs ɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1. weariness of body or mind from strain, oppressive climate, etc.; listlessness; languor.
2. a condition of indolent indifference.
[1525–35; < Latin lassitūdō weariness]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lassitude - a state of comatose torpor (as found in sleeping sickness)
hebetude - mental lethargy or dullness
torpidity, torpor - a state of motor and mental inactivity with a partial suspension of sensibility; "he fell into a deep torpor"
2.lassitude - a feeling of lack of interest or energy
apathy - an absence of emotion or enthusiasm
3.lassitude - weakness characterized by a lack of vitality or energy
weakness - the property of lacking physical or mental strength; liability to failure under pressure or stress or strain; "his weakness increased as he became older"; "the weakness of the span was overlooked until it collapsed"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

lassitude

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

lassitude

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

lassitude

[ˈlæsɪtjuːd] Nlasitud f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lassitude

nMattigkeit f, → Trägheit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

lassitude

[ˈlæsɪtjuːd] n (frm) → apatia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

las·si·tude

n. lasitud, languidez, agotamiento.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
Always on horseback, he had never known what lassitude was.
There are the spiritually consumptive ones: hardly are they born when they begin to die, and long for doctrines of lassitude and renunciation.
In good time, nevertheless, as the ardor of youth declines; as years and dumps increase; as reflection lends her solemn pauses; in short, as a general lassitude overtakes the sated Turk; then a love of ease and virtue supplants the love for maidens; our Ottoman enters upon the impotent, repentant, admonitory stage of life, forswears, disbands the harem, and grown to an exemplary, sulky old soul, goes about all alone among the meridians and parallels saying his prayers, and warning each young Leviathan from his amorous errors.
Her rapid footsteps shook her own floors, and she routed lassitude and indifference wherever she came.
She gave a gesture of lassitude. She was exhausted.