latchkey


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Related to latchkey: latchkey children

latch·key

 (lăch′kē′)
n.
A key for opening a latch or lock, especially one on an outside door.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

latchkey

(ˈlætʃˌkiː)
n
1. a key for an outside door or gate, esp one that lifts a latch
2.
a. a supposed freedom from restrictions
b. (as modifier): a latchkey existence.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

latch•key

(ˈlætʃˌki)

n., pl. -keys.
a key for releasing a latch or springlock, esp. on an outer door.
[1815–25]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.latchkey - key for raising or drawing back a latch or opening an outside doorlatchkey - key for raising or drawing back a latch or opening an outside door
key - metal device shaped in such a way that when it is inserted into the appropriate lock the lock's mechanism can be rotated
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مِفْتاح الباب الرَّئيسي
domovní klíč
gadedørsnøgle
kapukulcs
lykill
dış kapı anahtarı

latchkey

[ˈlætʃkiː]
A. Nllave f
B. CPD latchkey child Nniño/a m/f cuya madre trabaja
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

latchkey

[ˈlætʃkiː] nclé f (de la porte d'entrée)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

latchkey

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

latchkey

[ˈlætʃˌkiː] nchiave f di casa
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

latch

(lӕtʃ) noun
a catch of wood or metal used to fasten a door etc. She lifted the latch and walked in.
ˈlatchkey noun
a small front-door key. She put her latchkey in the lock.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
In his testimony before the coroner he explained that having no latchkey and not caring to disturb the sleeping servants, he had, with no clearly defined intention, gone round to the rear of the house.
I let myself in with my latchkey, closed, locked and bolted the door, staggered to the foot of the staircase, and sat down.
But to my intense surprise those people stopped at it and the man in the top hat, producing a latchkey, let his two companions through, followed them, and with a heavy slam cut himself off from my astonished self and the rest of mankind.
He heard her cheerful "Good-night, cabby," as she ran up the steps and opened the door with a latchkey. In a few moments the lights flared up brightly behind the white curtains, and as he walked away he heard a window raised.
Margaret fumbled for her latchkey. Of course she had forgotten it.
He had scarcely left the room, and allowed the ticking to become audible again, when a quick hand turned a latchkey in the house- door, opened it, and shut it.
Taking a latchkey from the girl and the coin from Hawker, Flambeau let himself and his friend into the empty house and passed into the outer parlour.
He was still deep in gloomy thought when he inserted his latchkey and opened the door of his flat.
And he jingled the skeleton bunch that he carried on a chain as honest men carry their latchkeys.
In HA[c]ctor Tobar's "A Portrait of the Artist as a Latchkey Child," time drips away for a boy whose mother is out trying to get lost in Los Angeles.
He is also the author of "A Latchkey Kid's Take on Modern Cinema," a collection of essays and reviews that examines the works of more than 120 directors of contemporary and classic films.