latewood


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late·wood

 (lăt′wo͝od′)
n.
Wood in a growth ring of a tree that is produced late in the growing season and is harder and less porous than earlywood. Also called summerwood.

latewood

(ˈleɪtˌwʊd)
n
(Botany) wood that is formed late in a tree's growing season and which forms the darker part of the annual ring of growth
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For example, these two species have distinct differences with respect to the transition from earlywood to latewood with Douglas-fir having an abrupt transition and white fir having a gradual transition.
Analyzing more minutely it is noticed that the relative proportion of latewood per unit length in the specimens used is greater in the tangential plane than in the radial plane, which help understand, among other factors, the highest values of the first mentioned plan.
Previous work on spin--spin relaxation rates in wood suggested that MR measurements could differentiate lumen water in earlywood and latewood owing to different cell cavity sizes.
First, the data from five representative oak sites were collected and combined for a regional approach where the obtained chronologies displaying the earlywood, latewood and annual growth (i.
For the tree-ring portion of the study, researchers still included tree-ring width in their analysis, but they focused on the maximum latewood density of trees--the greatest thickness of the typically dark portion of the annual tree ring--which is particularly sensitive to changes in temperature over time and provided distinct detection of all major eruptions.
Non-stationary influence of El Nino-Southern Oscillation and winter temperature on oak latewood growth in NW Iberian Peninsula.
2001; KRETSCHMANN, 2008), lower moisture content (KRETSCHMANN, 2008), lower percentage of latewood, lower cellulose content, higher lignin content, higher longitudinal shrinkage, thinner cell walls (KRETSCHMANN, 1998) and lower natural durability (DUNISCH et al.
Each tree ring was exactly dated by using standard dendrochronologic methods described by Douglass (17), and earlywood and latewood growth increments were measured by using a stage micrometer.
Few teased out the seasonal climate signal recorded in the narrow part of the growth ring laid down in late summer known as latewood.
The anatomical demarcation between rings is readily identifiable in most conifers due to formation of denser, darker latewood at the end of the growing season that contrasts with the lighter earlywood of the following year.
The 50% formulation had adhesion problems to latewood.