latewood


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late·wood

 (lăt′wo͝od′)
n.
Wood in a growth ring of a tree that is produced late in the growing season and is harder and less porous than earlywood. Also called summerwood.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

latewood

(ˈleɪtˌwʊd)
n
(Botany) wood that is formed late in a tree's growing season and which forms the darker part of the annual ring of growth
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
Gray, (Apocynacae), has annual growth rings in the belowground tuber-like taproot identified by a semi-porous ring structure with a thick latewood band of parenchyma cells (Dee and Palmer, 2017).
Chemical composition of earlywood and latewood in Norway spruce heartwood.
Correlation coefficient between monthly average precipitation and accumulative from 1961 to 2004, and total annual ring, earlywood and latewood indexes of Pinus oocarpa.
(9) Auxiliary cells in latewood aiding survival of cambium.
Researchers looked at previous measurements of latewood tree rings taken from the British Isles and the northeast Mediterranean region, with the rings covering the years 1728-1975 (latewood is the portion of an annual tree ring that forms in the latter part of the growing season).
Owing to its spot size, the ASD probe was able to capture more sample variability, that is, variation in earlywood and latewood components of individual rings, while it was not possible to achieve the same coverage when collecting two spectra using the Foss probe.
Boreal temperature variability inferred from maximum latewood density and tree-ring width data, Wrangell Mountain region, Alaska.
For example, these two species have distinct differences with respect to the transition from earlywood to latewood with Douglas-fir having an abrupt transition and white fir having a gradual transition.
Analyzing more minutely it is noticed that the relative proportion of latewood per unit length in the specimens used is greater in the tangential plane than in the radial plane, which help understand, among other factors, the highest values of the first mentioned plan.
Red oak is a ring porous hardwood with prominent and conspicuous rays and thick-walled latewood vessels.