launce

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Related to launces: launches

launce

 (lăns, läns, lôns)
[Perhaps alteration of lance.]

launce

(lɑːns)
n
(Animals) another name for the sand eel

sand′ lance`


n.
any slender marine fish of the family Ammodytidae that burrows into the sand.
[1770–80; appar. lance, from its shape]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.launce - very small silvery eellike schooling fishes that burrow into sandy beacheslaunce - very small silvery eellike schooling fishes that burrow into sandy beaches
acanthopterygian, spiny-finned fish - a teleost fish with fins that are supported by sharp inflexible rays
Ammodytes, genus Ammodytes - type genus of the Ammodytidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Quite possibly although there have been a lot of Launces and a lot of Crabs.
I think Crab, my dog, be the sourest-natured dog that lives," says Launce, servant to Proteus, one of the play's main characters.
223) See Jose Pagliery, FBI Launces a Face Recognition System, CNN (Sept.
Nay, 'twill be this hour ere I have done weeping; all the kind of the Launces have this very fault.
Although, as is affirmed by Muliini, an Italian scholar of Shakespeare's clowns (12) it was a common practice of the minstrels who performed in the public square to bring with them a dog, who would be involved in their performance, and it was also a common practice among the English to domesticate dogs (1983: 184), Launce in the subsequent monologue repeats almost literally the words of Ruzante cited above: "I have taught him, even as one would say precisely; thus I would teach a dog" (38).
To enter this competition, answer this simple question: What are Launces more commonly known as?
The Can and the yellow buoy off St Mary's Island has produced cod to 7lb - mainly on ragworm - and there are also reports of a few Launces (sand eels) being taken - this means the mackerel cannot be far behind.
Touched off by Mick Channon's Launces Lad on his debut, he should have too much pace for his rivals, while Henry Cecil's Moonshadow can show the benefit of a recent break in the Daniel Maiden Stakes (3.
she also comments explicitly on the function of the tragic action in a metatheatrical epilogue, whose beginning is especially significant for the present discussion: "Here are the launces that have sluic'd forth sinne, / And ript the venom'd ulcer of foule lust" (2718-19).
Here are the launces that have sluic'd forth sinne, And ript the venom'd ulcer of foule lust, Which being by due vengeance qualified, Here Tragedie of force must needes conclude.