laundrywoman


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laundrywoman

(ˈlɔːndrɪwʊmən)
n, pl -women
1. (Professions) a woman who collects or delivers laundry
2. (Professions) a woman who works in a laundry
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.laundrywoman - a working woman who takes in washinglaundrywoman - a working woman who takes in washing
washer - someone who washes things for a living
References in classic literature ?
Poor as he is, he didn't forget a servant or a child in the house, and not a soul here, from the French laundrywoman to Miss Norton forgot him.
'Back then, this was also one of my problems,' says Bueno, who adds that he and his two older siblings relied solely on their mother Myrna's earnings as a laundrywoman. 'When I became a teacher, I felt burdened seeing these kids go through the same thing.
At the time, the girl's mother worked as the laundrywoman of the manager of the radio station where Patino used to be one of its anchors.
This definition cannot be interpreted to include laundrywoman working in the staff houses of a company, like Annie who attends to the needs of the company's guest and other persons availing of its facilities.
She is the consummate multitasker, at once nanny, cook, laundrywoman and house cleaner.
She is the laundrywoman who has fallen in love, fell with a thud out of love nd fallen in love again.
"Even if the government provides free education and assistance under the conditional cash transfer programme or 4Ps, sending children to school is still difficult, especially now when the prices of commodities are rising," Tessie Perez who works as a laundrywoman told Gulf News.
Petersburg, Russia, Anna Pavlova lived in poverty as the daughter of a laundrywoman. Her life changed dramatically when her mother took her to the ballet: "A story unfolds.
TUESDAY The Real Marigold Hotel BBC Two, 9pm The group settle into life in their base in Jaipur, India, as Wayne Sleep and Bobby George have a cut-throat shave, Patti Boulaye and Miriam Margoyles visit a local laundrywoman, and Jan Leeming attends a psychic guru and is astounded at his profound observations on her life.
The last person to be hanged as a witch in Boston, Massachusetts, was an Irish laundrywoman named Ann (or perhaps Mary) Glover, put to death on November 16,1688.
The former laundrywoman turned gold buyer directs the procession to her small milling shack amid grunts from the miners whose backs are stooped under the weight of their hauls from the dangerous honeycomb tunnels of Mount Diwata.
In reference to slavery outside of the United States, Wong also describes Mary Prince's departure from her master once she is brought as a nursemaid and laundrywoman to London.