laura


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laura

(ˈlɔːrə)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) (in the medieval Christian Church) a group of monastic cells in a desert area, where reclusive monks lived
Translations
Laura
Laura
Laura
Laura
Laura
Laura
Laura
References in classic literature ?
His interview with Laura had evidently grieved and surprised him more than he liked to confess.
I went in, as usual, through the door between our two bed-rooms, to bid Laura good-night before she went to sleep.
This has frightened me, because it looks as if his one fixed idea about Laura was becoming too much for his mind.
He sat down opposite to us at the table, and Laura remained by me.
There was just one moment of dead silence before Laura addressed him.
The few plain words which would have brought him back to the point from which he had wandered were just on my lips, when Laura checked me by speaking again.
Presently Laura ran against her, and at once began feeling her hands, examining her dress, and trying to find out if she knew her; but not succeeding in this, she turned away as from a stranger, and the poor woman could not conceal the pang she felt, at finding that her beloved child did not know her.
She then gave Laura a string of beads which she used to wear at home, which were recognised by the child at once, who, with much joy, put them around her neck, and sought me eagerly to say she understood the string was from her home.
The mother now sought to caress her, but poor Laura repelled her, preferring to be with her acquaintances.
Such are a few fragments from the simple but most interesting and instructive history of Laura Bridgman.
Like Laura Bridgman, this young child was deaf, and dumb, and blind.
Howe's account of this pupil's first instruction is so very striking, and so intimately connected with Laura herself, that I cannot refrain from a short extract.