law-breaking


Also found in: Thesaurus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.law-breaking - (criminal law) an act punishable by lawlaw-breaking - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
evildoing, transgression - the act of transgressing; the violation of a law or a duty or moral principle; "the boy was punished for the transgressions of his father"
barratry - the offense of vexatiously persisting in inciting lawsuits and quarrels
capital offense - a crime so serious that capital punishment is considered appropriate
cybercrime - crime committed using a computer and the internet to steal a person's identity or sell contraband or stalk victims or disrupt operations with malevolent programs
felony - a serious crime (such as murder or arson)
forgery - criminal falsification by making or altering an instrument with intent to defraud
fraud - intentional deception resulting in injury to another person
Had crime - (Islam) serious crimes committed by Muslims and punishable by punishments established in the Koran; "Had crimes include apostasy from Islam and murder and theft and adultery"
highjack, hijack - seizure of a vehicle in transit either to rob it or divert it to an alternate destination
mayhem - the willful and unlawful crippling or mutilation of another person
infraction, misdemeanor, misdemeanour, violation, infringement - a crime less serious than a felony
perpetration, committal, commission - the act of committing a crime
attempt, attack - the act of attacking; "attacks on women increased last year"; "they made an attempt on his life"
Tazir crime - (Islam) minor crimes committed by Muslims; crimes that are not mentioned in the Koran so judges are free to punish the offender in any appropriate way; "in some Islamic nations Tazir crimes are set by legislation"
regulatory offence, regulatory offense, statutory offence, statutory offense - crimes created by statutes and not by common law
thuggery - violent or brutal acts as of thugs
high treason, lese majesty, treason - a crime that undermines the offender's government
vice crime - a vice that is illegal
victimless crime - an act that is legally a crime but that seem to have no victims; "he considers prostitution to be a victimless crime"
war crime - a crime committed in wartime; violation of rules of war
criminal law - the body of law dealing with crimes and their punishment
abduct, kidnap, nobble, snatch - take away to an undisclosed location against their will and usually in order to extract a ransom; "The industrialist's son was kidnapped"
shanghai, impress - take (someone) against his will for compulsory service, especially on board a ship; "The men were shanghaied after being drugged"
commandeer, highjack, hijack, pirate - take arbitrarily or by force; "The Cubans commandeered the plane and flew it to Miami"
skyjack - subject an aircraft to air piracy; "the plane was skyjacked to Uzbekistan"
carjack - take someone's car from him by force, usually with the intention of stealing it; "My car was carjacked last night!"
extort - obtain through intimidation
blackmail - obtain through threats
scalp - sell illegally, as on the black market
bootleg - sell illicit products such as drugs or alcohol; "They were bootlegging whiskey"
black market, run - deal in illegally, such as arms or liquor
fob off, foist off, palm off - sell as genuine, sell with the intention to deceive
push - sell or promote the sale of (illegal goods such as drugs); "The guy hanging around the school is pushing drugs"
black marketeer - deal on the black market
pyramid - use or deal in (as of stock or commercial transaction) in a pyramid deal
ransom, redeem - exchange or buy back for money; under threat
traffic - deal illegally; "traffic drugs"
rustle, lift - take illegally; "rustle cattle"
shoplift - steal in a store
stick up, hold up - rob at gunpoint or by means of some other threat
mug - rob at gunpoint or with the threat of violence; "I was mugged in the streets of New York last night"
pirate - copy illegally; of published material
plagiarise, plagiarize, lift - take without referencing from someone else's writing or speech; of intellectual property
crib - take unauthorized (intellectual material)
bribe, grease one's palms, buy, corrupt - make illegal payments to in exchange for favors or influence; "This judge can be bought"
rake off - take money from an illegal transaction
buy off, pay off - pay someone with influence in order to receive a favor
Translations

law-breaking

[ˈlɔːˌbreɪkɪŋ]
References in classic literature ?
As we came upon the fleet of law-breaking fishermen, each boat two or three hundred yards from its neighbors, and boats and nets dotting the river as far as we could see, Charley said:
BEIRUT, Aug 9 (KUNA) -- A Canadian citizen detained in Syria since last year for alleged law-breaking has been released, a high-ranking Lebanese police officer said on Friday.
City Police Officer, Rawalpindi, Mohammad Faisal Rana has issued directives to launch a crackdown on net cafes which, he said, had been emerging as the cause of law-breaking and immoral activities.
RAWALPINDI -- Unlawful detention and the concept of private torture cells in the name of investigation is the totally unbearable and worst example of law-breaking.
He was one of 3,000 law-breaking drivers filmed by police from a fleet of three Highways England-funded HGVs over the past year.
Any conviction achieved by law-breaking would be revisited as would any law-breaking decision taken by a council.
The rest of the country except her and the law-breaking bikers are against it.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- Members of parliament in the United Kingdom called on police in London to launch an investigation into alleged law-breaking by pro-Brexit campaign groups that advocated for the country to leave the European Union.
Danielle Goodwin, of housing charity Shelter, said: "We speak to people at the end of their tether after a law-breaking landlord causes chaos.
Surely he was not a 'hero' and, although he paid a high price for his law-breaking by a long period in a US prison, I found little to admire in his life and work.
It has been happening for years, because as Clerides said, the practice of the AG's office had been to serve law-breaking lawmakers with fines for such offences after they ceased being deputies.
However, anything which threatens to affect the number of boots on the ground to help prevent law-breaking and the ability of police in our region to investigate effectively when we are affected by crime, would be a worry for us all.