lawyerlike

lawyerlike

(ˈlɔːjəˌlaɪk)
adj
resembling a lawyer or lawyers
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In the six policy chapters MacKinnon occasionally engages in lawyerlike selection of evidence, for example by ignoring the role academic administrators have played in creating conditions that led to faculty unionization from the U of S twenty-five years ago to Simon Fraser University this year.
"organized and presented in a lawyerlike fashion" by her
in a lawyerlike way, told of a defendant for whom the judge, after
Central to his success has been the application of voracious, lawyerlike research methods to each industry he enters.
We discovered 19,479 lawyers who are performing "lawyerlike" functions--litigating, preparing legal memoranda, giving legal advice, and drafting statutes, rules, and regulations.
It was a good firm basis for lawyerlike assuming and lawyerlike procedures, and he had a very high regard and reputation among practicing lawyers who had been subjected to his courses.
suggest[ed] application to those who, like attorneys, gain approval to appear in a lawyerlike capacity" rather than to pro se litigants.
(34) Whether reviewing the Second Confiscation Act, (35) courts-martial, (36) or even writing the Emancipation Proclamation, (37) his analysis brought a certain "[l]awyerly dryness." (38) Lincoln had a "lawyerlike concern for the rules and forms of policy making, even when those rules and forms prevented a more robust pursuit of grandiose ideals like racial equality, justice, or retribution toward the South's rebels." (39) He was "grease"--the grease between debtors and creditors, the grease between business partners who have gone separate ways, and the grease between warring factions.
This insight fuels DeLombard's explanation of Frederick Douglass's changing attitudes toward Garrisonian abolitionism, which she traces to Douglass's refusal to remain merely a witness to slavery's wrongs and his expressed determination to "talk lawyerlike about law" (125).
Mechanic notes, "Jim and Tom have practiced law and where they're not disparate at all is in their lawyerlike qualities--a discipline, intellectual curiosity, attention to detail, aggressiveness and ambition."
To Bill, the word "lawyerlike" is the highest form of praise; by this term, I think he means a kind of legal analysis that does not begin with an intuitive perception of where the analyst wants the argument to go, but that instead proceeds by assembling the relevant materials, breaking the question down into its constituent parts, and finally drawing the appropriate legal inferences from their relationships.
Moreover, it had been a habit through many centuries to consult books rather than inspect afresh what the books were presumed to be about; to cite authorities, to quote the Fathers of the Church, to pit one scholar's paragraphs against another's; thus to debate each issue inside the precincts of the word, and this lawyerlike practice was hard to break.