layabout

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lay·a·bout

 (lā′ə-bout′)
n.
A lazy or idle person; a loafer.

layabout

(ˈleɪəˌbaʊt)
n
a lazy person; loafer
vb
(preposition, usually intr or reflexive) old-fashioned to hit out with violent and repeated blows in all directions

lay•a•bout

(ˈleɪ əˌbaʊt)

n.
a lazy or idle person; loafer.
[1930–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.layabout - person who does no worklayabout - person who does no work; "a lazy bum"
nonworker - a person who does nothing
clock watcher - a worker preoccupied with the arrival of quitting time
couch potato - an idler who spends much time on a couch (usually watching television)
dallier, dillydallier, dilly-dallier, lounger, mope - someone who wastes time
dawdler, laggard, lagger, trailer, poke, drone - someone who takes more time than necessary; someone who lags behind
daydreamer, woolgatherer - someone who indulges in idle or absentminded daydreaming
lazybones - a lazy person
lie-abed, slugabed - a person who stays in bed until a relatively late hour
loon - a worthless lazy fellow
shirker, slacker - a person who shirks his work or duty (especially one who tries to evade military service in wartime)
sluggard, slug - an idle slothful person
spiv - a person without employment who makes money by various dubious schemes; goes about smartly dressed and having a good time
sunbather - someone who basks in the sunshine in order to get a suntan
trifler - one who behaves lightly or not seriously
whittler - someone who whittles (usually as an idle pastime)

layabout

noun idler, lounger, piker (Austral. & N.Z. slang), shirker, loafer, couch potato (slang), vagrant, laggard, skiver (Brit. slang), beachcomber, ne'er-do-well, good-for-nothing, wastrel, bludger (Austral. & N.Z. informal), slubberdegullion (archaic) The plaintiff's sole witness, a gambler and layabout, was easily discredited.

layabout

noun
A self-indulgent person who spends time avoiding work or other useful activity:
Slang: slouch.
Translations
شَخْص كَسْلان
povaleč
dagdriver
slæpingi
avare kimseaylak

layabout

[ˈleɪəbaʊt] Nholgazán/ana m/f, vago/a m/f

layabout

[ˈleɪəbaʊt] nfainéant(e) m/flay-by layby [ˈleɪbaɪ] n (British)aire f de stationnement sur le bas-côtélay days npl (NAUTICAL, NAVAL)estarie f

layabout

[ˈle/ɛ7əˌbaʊt] n (fam) → sfaccendato/a, fannullone/a

lay1

(lei) past tense, past participle laid (leid) verb
1. to place, set or put (down), often carefully. She laid the clothes in a drawer / on a chair; He laid down his pencil; She laid her report before the committee.
2. to place in a lying position. She laid the baby on his back.
3. to put in order or arrange. She went to lay the table for dinner; to lay one's plans / a trap.
4. to flatten. The animal laid back its ears; The wind laid the corn flat.
5. to cause to disappear or become quiet. to lay a ghost / doubts.
6. (of a bird) to produce (eggs). The hen laid four eggs; My hens are laying well.
7. to bet. I'll lay five pounds that you don't succeed.
ˈlayer noun
1. a thickness or covering. The ground was covered with a layer of snow; There was a layer of clay a few feet under the ground.
2. something which lays, especially a hen. a good layer.
verb
to put, cut or arrange in layers. She had her hair layered by the hairdresser.
ˈlayabout noun
a lazy, idle person.
ˈlay-byplural ˈlay-bys noun
especially in Britain, a short extra part at the side of a road for people to stop their cars in, out of the way of the traffic.
ˈlayout noun
the manner in which something is displayed or laid out. the layout of the building.
laid up
ill in bed. When I caught flu, I was laid up for a fortnight.
lay aside
to put away or to one side, especially to be used or dealt with at a later time. She laid the books aside for later use.
lay bare
to show clearly; to expose to view. They dug up the road and laid bare the water-pipe; Shy people don't like to lay bare their feelings.
lay by
to put away for future use. She laid by a store of tinned vegetables.
lay down
1. to give up. They laid down their arms; The soldiers laid down their lives in the cause of peace.
2. to order or instruct. The rule book lays down what should be done in such a case.
3. to store. My father laid down a good stock of wine which I am now drinking.
lay (one's) hands on
1. to find or be able to obtain. I wish I could lay (my) hands on that book!
2. to catch. The police had been trying to lay hands on the criminal for months.
lay in
to get and store a supply of. I've laid in an extra stock of drinks for Christmas.
lay low
to make ill. I was laid low by flu, just before my exams.
lay off
to dismiss (employees) temporarily. Because of a shortage of orders, the firm has laid off a quarter of its workforce.
lay on
to provide. The staff laid on a tea party for the pupils.
lay out
1. to arrange over a wide area (especially according to a plan). He was the architect who laid out the public gardens.
2. to spread so as to be easily seen. He laid out the contents of the box on the table.
3. to knock unconscious.
4. to spend (money).
5. to prepare (a dead body) to be buried.
lay up
1. to keep or store. We laid up a good supply of apples this year from our own trees.
2. to put (a ship) out of use in a dock.
lay waste
to make (a piece of land) into barren country by burning and plundering.

lay needs an object and has laid as its past tense and past participle: He (had) laid his book down ; He will be laying his proposals before the committee tomorrow .
lie takes no object and has lying as its present participle, lay as its past tense and lain as its past participle: Please lie down ; He lay down ; He had lain there for hours .
lie , to be untruthful, has lying as its present participle, and lied as its past tense and past participle: She (has always) lied about her age .
References in periodicals archive ?
Yes, Britain is full of violence, junkies and layabouts.
The funny thing is, all these people who criticise the Bardsleys seem quite happy for the taxpayer to be handing out a real fortune to the layabouts who live in Buckingham Palace.
Ainsley (Fame Academy); Owen Davis (Holby City); Richard Park (Fame Academy); the airheads of Sex & The City; Kerry Mc- Fadden (Elimidate); all the stroppy, useless layabouts in Jamie's Kitchen.
Instead of being untidy and idle layabouts, with no idea of the value of money and no thought for the future, they show a lot more maturity and responsibility than their parents did at their age.
Scientists at Glasgow University believe that layabouts, such as Govan's celebrated slacker, could be born with an inbuilt "lazy gene".
I WAS outraged at reader D Brown branding students as beer-swilling, pot-smoking work-shy layabouts (Mailbox, July 25).
While the Americans launched massive investigations, our own servicemen were treated like work-shy layabouts making a fuss about nothing.
Unlike many layabouts who squeal to tax the rich in order for the state to help them and their offspring from the cradle to the grave.
Government Ministers should remember the young man's name next time they smear the jobless as layabouts and feckless.
I've no doubt there are layabouts and scroungers in society; we've always had that element.
IN response to Bill Crawford's attack on me following my letter about greedy work-shy layabouts on a TV programme, I certainly know all about being poor.
WHILST I agree wholeheartedly with Dave Pithie's criticism (Letters, June 3) of the layabouts and illegal immigrants who exploit our welfare system for every penny that they can get out of it, whilst he (and I) have spent our working lives honestly paying our dues in order to qualify for our state pensions, I find it rather amusing that he cannot resist trying to absolve his beloved socialism from blame for the fiasco that he rightly complains about, because, he says, socialism requires that you have to contribute in order to receive benefits.