layered


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lay·er

 (lā′ər)
n.
1.
a. One that lays: a tile layer.
b. A hen kept for laying eggs.
2.
a. A single thickness of a material covering a surface or forming an overlying part or segment: a layer of dust on the windowsill; a cake with four layers.
b. A usually horizontal deposit or expanse; a stratum: layers of sedimentary rock; a layer of warm air.
c. A depth or level: a poem with several layers of meaning.
3. Botany A stem that is covered with soil for rooting while still part of the living plant.
4. An item of clothing worn over or under another.
v. lay·ered, lay·er·ing, lay·ers
v.tr.
1. To divide or form into layers: layered gravel and charcoal to make a filter.
2. To cut (hair) into different, usually overlapping lengths.
3. Botany To propagate (a plant) by means of a layer.
4. To wear (clothing) in layers.
v.intr.
1. To form or come apart as layers.
2. Botany To take root as a result of layering.

layered

(ˈleɪəd)
adj
1. arranged in layers; having layers
2. having several levels
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.layered - with one layer on top of another; "superimposed rocks"
bedded, stratified - deposited or arranged in horizontal layers; "stratified rock"
Translations

layered

[ˈleɪərd] adj
a layered dress → une robe à volants

layered

[ˈleɪəd] adj (rocks) → stratificato/a; (potatoes, mushrooms) → a strati
References in periodicals archive ?
A regular glass rod will crack easily, but in a layered glass rod, the incoming energy from a mechanical load dissipates into the glue between the layers.
ISCSI, like standard SCSI, is a block-based storage protocol layered underneath the file system.
Understanding the uses and logic behind the scales is essential to understanding pricing of layered accounts.
Over the past year and a half, several major producers of high-tech, highly layered flexible films for barrier food wrap have qualified their first coextruded films for medical packaging.
Polymer films that absorb a lot of water, for example, aren't good environments for cell growth, so Rubner's lab has been using two oppositely charged polymers, commonly called PAA and PAH, to create layered films that swell with different amounts of water depending on the acidity of their environments.
The only North American processors who appear to be growing and reinvesting are those making the new highly layered films.